Author Topic: Plate for Remote Cameras  (Read 2062 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Andrew Lahodynskyj

  • Professional
  • Toronto
  • Posts: 7
    • Twitter
    • Instagram
      • Email
Plate for Remote Cameras
« on: May 19, 2015, 10:37 PM »
Hey,

I was wondering if anyone has any recommendations for a plate for setting a remote camera on. Don't really want to spend a ton of money on this, but want something that will last.

I did some research and found fplate. Anyone have experience with this?

Thanks!


Toronto Freelancer.

Offline David Buzzard

  • Inactive Member
  • Whistler BC, Canada
  • Posts: 130
    • Twitter
    • Instagram
      • David Buzzard Photography
      • Email
Re: Plate for Remote Cameras
« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2015, 02:11 AM »
Why not just get some steel plate and bolt a ball head to it?


Freelance for the Whistler Question, Pique NewsMagazine, and the Squamish Chief

Offline Blair Gable

  • Inactive Member
  • Ottawa, ON
  • Posts: 367
      • Blair Gable Photography
Re: Plate for Remote Cameras
« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2015, 07:12 PM »
I made my own maybe 7 years ago out of aircraft aluminum and turned the screw threads by hand. Used it once.


Freelance picture-maker.

http://www.blairgable.com

Offline Warren Toda

  • Administrator
  • Toronto
  • Posts: 1964
      • www.warrentoda.com
      • Email
Re: Plate for Remote Cameras
« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2015, 03:02 PM »
Try the photo aisle at Home Depot :)

I've seen photographers who just use a piece of plywood with a bolt stuck through it. If you don't like wood (or metal), you can also use a chunk of plastic.

Or spend more and get a mini tripod, for example Manfrotto or a GorillaPod?


Photographer in Toronto
info@warrentoda.com

Offline David Buzzard

  • Inactive Member
  • Whistler BC, Canada
  • Posts: 130
    • Twitter
    • Instagram
      • David Buzzard Photography
      • Email
Re: Plate for Remote Cameras
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2015, 09:01 PM »
I've seen Manfrotto short background stands used as well.  They're about $80, and you can put a light on it when you're not mounting remote cameras to it.  https://www.vistek.ca/store/ProPhotoLightingStands/230535/manfrotto-012b-backlite-stand-black.aspx


Freelance for the Whistler Question, Pique NewsMagazine, and the Squamish Chief

Offline Warren Toda

  • Administrator
  • Toronto
  • Posts: 1964
      • www.warrentoda.com
      • Email
Re: Plate for Remote Cameras
« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2015, 02:52 PM »
Here's a picture that shows a Gorillapod in use.


Photographer in Toronto
info@warrentoda.com

Offline Andrew Lahodynskyj

  • Professional
  • Toronto
  • Posts: 7
    • Twitter
    • Instagram
      • Email
Re: Plate for Remote Cameras
« Reply #6 on: June 18, 2015, 03:23 PM »
Thanks for the tips guys!

The Gorillapod sounds quite nice.

I have a friend making an 8" x 8" aluminium plate for me out of scrap so I'm going to test that out. Since he's not charging anything, i can always order the Gorillapod if the plate doesn't work for me.

Is there much of a difference between using the plate or a mini tripod?


Toronto Freelancer.

Offline Warren Toda

  • Administrator
  • Toronto
  • Posts: 1964
      • www.warrentoda.com
      • Email
Re: Plate for Remote Cameras
« Reply #7 on: July 31, 2015, 07:08 PM »
At the Pan Am Games in Toronto last week, a few photographers used the "official" aluminum plate, some used a table-top tripod or a backlite stand, and several photogs just used a black-painted block of plywood.


Photographer in Toronto
info@warrentoda.com

Offline Warren Toda

  • Administrator
  • Toronto
  • Posts: 1964
      • www.warrentoda.com
      • Email
Re: Plate for Remote Cameras
« Reply #8 on: December 14, 2016, 06:13 PM »
A bit late but you might also get one of these plates. The company that makes this, and a bunch of other stuff, is based in Toronto.


Photographer in Toronto
info@warrentoda.com


Offline Warren Toda

  • Administrator
  • Toronto
  • Posts: 1964
      • www.warrentoda.com
      • Email
Re: Plate for Remote Cameras
« Reply #10 on: January 27, 2018, 08:39 PM »
The company that made the original(?) aluminum plate went out of business six(?) years ago after being in business for only three or four years (how many plates can you possibly sell?). But another new business popped up about a year ago and is selling a somewhat similar product for a similar price.


Many "hit and run" companies only sell their product(s) for a short time. It's like being a "one-hit-wonder" band where you have just one popular song for a short time.

This seems to be a trend in business these days: someone has an idea for a product, they crowd-fund it (or they give up), manufacture the product, get a web site, sell a bunch, and then close up shop when the demand stops. Relatively minimal investment and minimal risk involved.

« Last Edit: January 27, 2018, 08:52 PM by Warren Toda »

Photographer in Toronto
info@warrentoda.com