Author Topic: ok, here goes...  (Read 3759 times)

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Offline Lisa Morris

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ok, here goes...
« on: October 10, 2011, 08:20 PM »
Here it is, the start of my editorial portfolio.

A few things to know:
I built this site using 500px.com templates; I like the simplicity in what they have to offer.
I've been shooting for about five years and I'm a soon-to-be graduate from the photography program at Conestoga College here in Kitchener (soon-to-be meaning I need to complete a 30-hour internship with another photographer... which hasn't happened yet - *have camera, will travel* ;-)
There was very basic editorial teaching in this program; the only exposure to photojournalism was a slideshow of images from one teacher's former PJ days.
I have been reading and studying and immersing myself in everything photojournalism, with the hopes of really making this my career. As my bio says, I'm planning on heading to Loyalist next fall.
In the mean time, I run out to as many events and happenings as I can to build my portfolio (ie, the G20 and the 10th anniversary of 9/11 in NYC).

I'm determined to improve and I'd appreciate other photographers to really critique my work.

Please & thanks!

http://www.photographerlisa.com


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-Lisa
@photojlisa
photographerlisa.com

Offline Kenneth Armstrong

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Re: ok, here goes...
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2011, 06:40 PM »
I think for your bio you can skip that you are a student. Sound like you're picking up work, I would keep concentrating on that.

For my personal taste there is way too much digital B&W. I love black and white photography but it especially bothered me in the Uniforms section where there was a sequence with a little girl, in one shot she's in B&W and the next in colour. Again, that's my personal preference.

Not sure if there were enough "Noise Makers" to warrant their own section. Could you include those photos in an expanded Portraits section?

Everything seems to load as it should and it's easy to navigate.


--------------------

ken@kennetharmstrong.ca
www.kennetharmstrong.ca
Photographer
Sault Ste Marie

Offline Warren Toda

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Re: ok, here goes...
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2011, 07:15 PM »
Quote from: Lisa Murray
...I run out to as many events and happenings as I can to build my portfolio (ie, the G20 and the 10th anniversary of 9/11 in NYC).

I'm determined to improve and I'd appreciate other photographers to really critique my work.

Good for you on both of those.


(Pictures removed)


9/11/11 gallery:

• some pix need to be cropped tighter (e.g. 2, 4, 6, 7)  and others looser (5, 8 ).

• some of the backgrounds are distracting. In picture 2, the foreground is too busy:



Noise makers gallery:

• same band or maybe they all just look the same? Three of the four pix are good. Group shots are always tough.



Uniforms gallery:

• picture 1: crop slightly tighter to put more emphasis on the girl. Even then, that white cage-like thing is distracting.

• picture 2: crop tighter to put more emphasis on the guy looking at the camera.

• picture 3: I can't see me in the picture so I'd drop this photo.   :D   It's too far away, no uniforms and no point of interest.

• picture 4: crop out the two hatless guys?

• picture 5: See that pole thing?

• picture 6: crop a bit tighter, especially on the right edge? Although, I think you need to be more to the left to properly see his salute.

• picture 7 has no real point of interest. It's just a guy standing and staring.

• picture 8: crop tighter?

• picture 9: The girl has two heads?   :)  No real point of interest. I think the front girl needs to be alone and shot in total profile or you need to be more to the right to see each girl. Also, you may need more depth of field to help to show the police in the background. Somehow position yourself to have less bright white roadway.

• picture 10: crop tighter. How important is that tree branch? The window? The brick wall? The glass door?

• picture 11 crop tighter.

• picture 12: why is it off-centre with that bright grey concrete on one side? How important is the flag(?) in the background? Was there a way to frame the helmet through some flowers or between onlookers' bodies? Sometimes with static objects, the picture isn't so much the object but rather people's reaction to it. Adding human interest always helps.

• picture 13 crop tighter:

• picture 14: crop tighter:

• picture 15: crop tighter.

• picture 16: crop tighter. Don't really need the Howard Johnson's (?) hotel sign or the extra flags at the top of the frame.


sports+rec gallery

Sorry but nothing good to say here. The first picture isn't bad, but most others are either the wrong camera position or the wrong moment. Pictures 5, 6, 7 (and much of pictures 1, 2) are just people's backs and backs of heads. Faces are usually more interesting unless there's some fantastic body language.



iphone gallery:

Pictures 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8 are all nice.



Biography:
• use a larger font size; spell out "ON" - abbreviations don't work well on search engines.
• buy new sunglasses.  :D


======

So why does the iphone category have more good pictures than any of the other categories? What changes in your mind when you have an iphone instead of an SLR?


----
(Edit: removed the pictures.)

« Last Edit: October 18, 2011, 01:08 AM by Warren Toda »


Offline Kenneth Armstrong

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Re: ok, here goes...
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2011, 08:22 PM »
Warren, you're making me want to go back and re-crop every image I have ever taken :D


--------------------

ken@kennetharmstrong.ca
www.kennetharmstrong.ca
Photographer
Sault Ste Marie

Offline Lisa Morris

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Re: ok, here goes...
« Reply #4 on: October 13, 2011, 12:19 PM »
Thanks for the critique. I knew I had to/have to get closer but I thought perhaps leaving some space is good too. Perhaps not :)

The iPhone is... not as noticeable? always in my hand? No good answer here.


-----------
-Lisa
@photojlisa
photographerlisa.com

Offline Warren Toda

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Re: ok, here goes...
« Reply #5 on: October 13, 2011, 04:59 PM »
Quote from: Lisa Murray
Thanks for the critique. I knew I had to/have to get closer but I thought perhaps leaving some space is good too. Perhaps not :)

Leaving space or using space?

Does "leaving space" just mean backing off the zoom and shooting wider?

Space shouldn't just be empty space. It should be an "active" part of the photo composition. Space doesn't grow on trees, it doesn't just happen. 

Using space means the photographer chooses – ahead of time – to build space into the composition. Just as a photographer will readjust themselves, (for lack of a better phrase), to exclude a background distraction like a telephone pole, a photographer will readjust themselves to include space if the picture calls for it.

Tight crops are used to force the viewer's attention onto something rather than having the viewer's eyes wander aimlessly through the picture. Tight(er) crops are also used to get rid of distractions. Sometimes a bad photo position, bad luck or too short of a lens forces the photographer to crop tight to get rid of extraneous stuff. Crops are also used for the good-ol' Rule of Thirds thing.

A loose crop might be used to create a sense of scale, a feeling of (yes) space or place, or a sense of tension.

Here's a collection of pictures from the Toronto Star. Some are spacey and some are cropped tight. Notice how you react to the tight crops compared to the looser pictures. Neither is good or bad, it just depends on what the photographer is trying to do with the picture.


==============

Quote from: Lisa Murray
The iPhone is... not as noticeable? always in my hand? No good answer here.

Perhaps cellphone cameras and point-and-shoots are about fun whereas SLRs are about work, stress, finding a parking spot, why do I have four assignments in two hours, geez my shoulders are sore.

Compact camera = point and push the button.

SLR = Serious Labour Required

Do the minimal options in a cell phone camera inspire creativity but the zillion options in an SLR cause confusion or laziness?

From cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki:

Quote from: Emmanuel Lubezki
Art is made of constraints. When you don’t have any, you go crazy, because everything is possible.

« Last Edit: October 13, 2011, 06:13 PM by Warren Toda »


Offline Mark Blinch

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Re: ok, here goes...
« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2011, 04:28 PM »
I think you need to remove that school parts in your bio all together.

The quicker you stop calling yourself a student, the faster you will become a professional.

People will treat you like a student if that is what you call yourself. It also becomes an excuse to limit yourself if you consider yourself student. "Well you know Im just a student and I am just learning". Guess what, we are all learning. Photography is a life long lesson. It never stops.  Every little lesson and mistake made makes you more of a professional.

So are you a student or a photographer? People who will pay you money for pictures dont want to know what college your going to.