Author Topic: website and photography critique  (Read 957 times)

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Offline Robert Reyes Ong

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website and photography critique
« on: May 20, 2016, 01:58 PM »
Hi everyone,

My name is Rob, currently a photography student at Seneca college in Toronto, Ont. looking to specialize in photojournalism. Recently heard about this association after getting in touch with a local photojournalist in my area. Created a website not that long ago, and looking for some feedbacks on the web design and my photos. Looking to shoot more during the summer to add into my portfolio. Any feed back would help!

Thanks in advance!

Website - http://www.TheRobOng.com/

« Last Edit: May 21, 2016, 10:16 AM by Robert Reyes Ong »


Offline Warren Toda

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Re: website and photography critique
« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2016, 02:57 AM »
Sorry but all the news and commercial pictures are weak.

Sports pictures: some are good but many need better crops. For example:

1) In the running basketball player photo:  The player on the right isn't doing anything for the photo. Sometimes extra players can be used to frame the main subject but it doesn't work here.

2) With many sports, the best pictures aren't necessarily the action (i.e. the playing of the sport) but rather the players' emotions and reactions. With weightlifting, you don't always need the weights in the photo. Also with weightlifting, by shooting from the side, you can often eliminate the messy background and it makes the barbell less horizontal (i.e. less empty space in the photo).

3) In shooting basketball, the ceiling isn't usually important. Negative space can sometimes work but not in this case. Even the basketball net doesn't have to be in the photo. Less ceiling => more attention on the players.

4) In the volleyball jubo photo, the guy in the right-background occupies 20% of the frame yet he's doing nothing and isn't part of the story.

5) In the badminton photo: You don't always need full bodies in sports pictures unless there's some amazing body language.The player's facial expression is always important.




Edit: I removed the photos since they're no longer necessary.

« Last Edit: June 05, 2016, 03:30 AM by Warren Toda »


Offline David Buzzard

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Re: website and photography critique
« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2016, 04:11 AM »
Looks pretty good for someone just getting going. 

My advice to all young photographers; pay as much attention to the background as the foreground, as you're losing your subjects in cluttered backgrounds.  If you move in closer, you'll get shallower depth of field.  Be on the lookout for  distracting elements as well, sometimes all you have to do is take a step or two to the side.

Crank up your ISO on the sports photos.  Blurry shots are arty, but really, you want nice crisp images.  1/500th if the subject is coming at you, 1/1000 if they're moving across the frame.

I think you also need to go a little deeper into your subjects.  Try to self assign yourself a story you can spend some time on.

Check out the clip contests here in the NPAC, and don't be afraid to enter.  I find it helps if you have a goal to work for, so getting some shots you feel you can put in is as good as any.


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Offline Robert Reyes Ong

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Re: website and photography critique
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2016, 04:49 PM »
Thanks for the feed back, Warren! Will definitely keep your pointers in mind on my next sports assignment. One question, mainly about the (volleyball) players celebrating, is it fine to just cut off players body parts like that? Did want to crop that a bit tighter, but didn't want to cut any limbs off. Doesn't it seem accidental that their foot are chopped off like that?
They kept hammering us in school with not cutting off any limbs, or at least not abruptly like that.

Thanks,

Rob



(Edit - I deleted the repeated photos because I removed the original photos from my original post (above) since they're no longer needed.  - Warren Toda)

« Last Edit: June 05, 2016, 03:29 AM by Warren Toda »


Offline Robert Reyes Ong

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Re: website and photography critique
« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2016, 04:57 PM »
Looks pretty good for someone just getting going. 

My advice to all young photographers; pay as much attention to the background as the foreground, as you're losing your subjects in cluttered backgrounds.  If you move in closer, you'll get shallower depth of field.  Be on the lookout for  distracting elements as well, sometimes all you have to do is take a step or two to the side.

Crank up your ISO on the sports photos.  Blurry shots are arty, but really, you want nice crisp images.  1/500th if the subject is coming at you, 1/1000 if they're moving across the frame.

I think you also need to go a little deeper into your subjects.  Try to self assign yourself a story you can spend some time on.

Check out the clip contests here in the NPAC, and don't be afraid to enter.  I find it helps if you have a goal to work for, so getting some shots you feel you can put in is as good as any.

Thanks for the pointers, David!

I'm limited to keeping my indoor images at a low ISO since Seneca wants to use them for online purposes too.

With school out for the summer, definitely looking to stitch together a story and matching it with a news article from the newspaper. However, do recall my photojournalism instructor saying something along the lines of "the faster you can get your subject to be comfortable, the easier and better images you will get", just wanted to know if you would have any tips for this? Mainly, I find it a challenge getting someone I just met to be comfortable and look relaxed in the photo. Reason why most of my news article up is mainly candids

Will definitely check out the clip contests on this site, and will definitely enter in the future! 



Offline Warren Toda

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Re: website and photography critique
« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2016, 05:17 PM »
Quote from: Robert Reyes Ong
One question, mainly about the (volleyball) players celebrating, is it fine to just cut off players body parts like that? Did want to crop that a bit tighter, but didn't want to cut any limbs off. Doesn't it seem accidental that their foot are chopped off like that?
They kept hammering us in school with not cutting off any limbs, or at least not abruptly like that.

There's no definitive answer to cutting off limbs. Sometimes yes, sometimes no. It depends on the photo. You have to decide what's important to the photo and what's not.

When you crop, you're doing a few things:

     • cropping to improve your composition (maybe you were standing in the wrong spot, maybe your lens wasn't long enough or maybe you just did a lousy job of framing the image).

     • cropping to remove anything that's not important to the story.

     • cropping off anything that's distracting.

    (and sadly, sometimes cropping to fit a specific image dimension)

But all of this boils done to one purpose:

     • you're cropping to control the viewer's attention and eyeflow through the photo.

In the volleyball photo, cutting off a few feet isn't important since it gets rid of distracting background elements and helps keep viewer attention on the players. Viewers always look at faces first. If you leave in the background people you're giving viewers a chance to "wander away". In this case, some missing feet isn't an issue.

Offline David Buzzard

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Re: website and photography critique
« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2016, 12:22 PM »
Quote
I'm limited to keeping my indoor images at a low ISO since Seneca wants to use them for online purposes too.

Don't worry about that, just get some noise reduction software if you don't have a camera that handles high ISO that well.  Smooth photos aren't much use if they're blurry. 

Quote
Mainly, I find it a challenge getting someone I just met to be comfortable and look relaxed in the photo.

Well, that's the art of photojournalism.  You want to spend enough time with the subject so that they feel comfortable with you.  Some people are open and welcoming, so it's easy, and some people will fight you all the way.   


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