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1
Swap Shop / EF 24mm F1.4L Mk II
« Last post by Andrew Ryan on April 25, 2017, 03:35 PM »
Selling the lens for $1500
2
Contest Information / Re: February West Clips 2017 Results
« Last post by Chad Hipolito on April 20, 2017, 08:28 PM »
MULTI-PHOTO

Comments: The flying training school had the strongest pictures and was awarded first, but could have been cut in half. The protest had a strong variety of moments. The Syrian birthday party had several very good photos but needed a little more depth or variety.


1. Crystal Schick/Moose Jaw Times-Herald

A new set of pilot hopefuls start the ground school  section of phase two of 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School (2 CFFTS) at 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw on January 25, 2017. The 2 CFFTS trains over 150 pilots every year through the NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) program.


A CAE contract instructor teaches a new set of pilot hopefuls the classroom part of phase two of 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School (2 CFFTS) at 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw on January 25, 2017. The 2 CFFTS trains over 150 pilots every year through the NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) program.


A new set of pilot hopefuls start the ground school  section of phase two of 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School (2 CFFTS) at 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw on January 25, 2017. The 2 CFFTS trains over 150 pilots every year through the NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) program.


A CAE contract instructor watches monitors and talks to a student pilot during the simulation section of the 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School's (2 CFFTS) phase two at 15 Wing airbase in Moose Jaw, on January 25, 2017. The 2 CFFTS trains over 150 pilots every year through the NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) program.


A CAE contract instructor watches monitors and talks to a student pilot during the simulation section of the 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School's (2 CFFTS) phase two at 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw on January 25, 2017. The 2 CFFTS trains over 150 pilots every year through the NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) program.


A CAE contract instructor watches monitors and talks a student pilot through phase two's simulation section of 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School (2 CFFTS) at 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw on January 25, 2017. The 2 CFFTS trains over 150 pilots every year through the NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) program.


Jordan Birt, a captain with the United States Air Force on a three-year exchange to 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School (2 CFFTS), starts up a CT156 Harvard II turboprop simulator with the help of a CAE contract instructor at 15 Wing airbase near Moose Jaw on January 25, 2017.


Jordan Birt, a captain with the United States Air Force on a three-year exchange to 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School (2 CFFTS), starts up a CT156 Harvard II turboprop simulator with the help of a CAE contract instructor at 15 Wing airbase near Moose Jaw on January 25, 2017.


Jordan Birt, a captain with the United States Air Force on a three-year exchange to 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School (2 CFFTS), starts up a CT156 Harvard II turboprop simulator with the help of a CAE contract instructor at 15 Wing airbase near Moose Jaw on January 25, 2017.


Jane Gerster climbs into a mock CT156 Harvard II cockpit to experience the 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School's (2 CFFTS) egress training section while at 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw on February 1, 2017. The 2 CFFTS trains over 150 pilots every year through the NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) program.


Jane Gerster receives instruction from egress trainer Mario Deshaies at 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School (2 CFFTS) at 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw on February 1, 2017. The 2 CFFTS trains over 150 pilots every year through the NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) program.


Jane Gerster receives instruction from egress trainer Mario Deshaies at 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School (2 CFFTS) at 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw on February 1, 2017. The 2 CFFTS trains over 150 pilots every year through the NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) program.


A CT156 Harvard turboprop lays wrecked in a farmers field after a student and instructor pilot were forced to eject during a flight lesson at 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School (2 CFFTS) at 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw, on January 27, 2017. Both the pilot and instructor lived but sustained serious injuries.


A CT156 Harvard turboprop lays wrecked in a farmers field after a student and instructor pilot were forced to eject during a flight lesson at 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School (2 CFFTS) at 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw, on January 27, 2017. Both the pilot and instructor lived but sustained serious injuries.


Pilots and students participate in pre-flight briefings before a formation flight at 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw on February 2, 2017. The 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School produces over 150 pilots every year through the NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) program.


Pilots and students participate in pre-flight briefings before a formation flight at 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw on February 2, 2017. The 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School produces over 150 pilots every year through the NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) program.


Capt. Matt St-Jean, left, and Maj. Marc Andre Assselin prepare for takeoff in the flightline operations waiting area at 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw on February 2, 2017. The 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School produces over 150 pilots every year through the NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) program.


Pilots wait for their turn to fly in the flightline operations waiting area at 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw on February 2, 2017. The 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School produces over 150 pilots every year through the NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) program.


Moose Jaw is seen in the background as Capt. Matt St-Jean and Maj. Marc Andre Assselin practice formation flying in CT156 Harvard II turboprop planes near 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw on February 2, 2017. The 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School produces over 150 pilots every year through the NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) program.


Capt. Matt St-Jean and Maj. Marc Andre Assselin practice formation flying in CT156 Harvard II turboprop planes near 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw on February 2, 2017. The 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School produces over 150 pilots every year through the NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) program.


Capt. Matt St-Jean lands a CT156 Harvard II turboprop planes at 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw on February 2, 2017, after a practice formation flight with Maj. Marc Andre Assselin. The 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School produces over 150 pilots every year through the NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) program.


After completing phase two of The 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School, Shawn Ells is promote from 2 Lt. to Lt. in front of his peers at 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw on February 10, 2017. Ells will receive his wings at a special graduation ceremony later in the day.


After completing phase two of The 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School, Shawn Ells is promote from 2 Lt. to Lt. in front of his peers at 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw on February 10, 2017. Ells will receive his wings at a special graduation ceremony later in the day.


Nearly 100 friends and colleagues of Lt. Shawn Ells' participate in his graduation march and ceremony in the Snowbirds' hangar at 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw on February 10, 2017. The 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School produces over 150 pilots every year through the NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) program.


Nearly 100 friends and colleagues of Lt. Shawn Ells' participate in his graduation march and ceremony in the Snowbirds' hangar at 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw on February 10, 2017. The 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School produces over 150 pilots every year through the NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) program.


Brigadier-General D.W. Lowthian, who flew in from Winnipeg special for the event, inspects participants at the graduation ceremony of Lt. Shawn Ells at 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw, on February 10, 2017. The 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School produces over 150 pilots every year through the NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) program.


Brigadier-General D.W. Lowthian, who flew in from Winnipeg special for the event, pins wings on Lt. Shawn Ells during his graduation ceremony at 15 Wing airbase outside Moose Jaw on February 10, 2017. The 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School produces over 150 pilots every year through the NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) program.


2. Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press

Char Henry, holds a photo of her best friend Mecca Jay, who died last month as a result of a drug overdose, before a march on the first National Day of Action to draw attention to the opioid overdose epidemic, in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday February 21, 2017. Demonstrations were held in cities across the country to demand different levels of government take meaningful action to address the crisis by calling for an end to the war on drugs, the removal of barriers to health care including improved access to naloxone and opiate substitution therapy and the implementation of policies informed by drug users.


Richard Mackie carries a coffin to remember friends, family and community members who died as a result of overdoses during a march on the first National Day of Action to draw attention to the opioid overdose epidemic, in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday February 21, 2017. Demonstrations were held in cities across the country to demand different levels of government take meaningful action to address the crisis by calling for an end to the war on drugs, the removal of barriers to health care including improved access to naloxone and opiate substitution therapy and the implementation of policies informed by drug users.


Dean Anderson holds up a sign before a march on the first National Day of Action to draw attention to the opioid overdose epidemic, in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday February 21, 2017. Demonstrations were held in cities across the country to demand different levels of government take meaningful action to address the crisis by calling for an end to the war on drugs, the removal of barriers to health care including improved access to naloxone and opiate substitution therapy and the implementation of policies informed by drug users.


People march down East Hastings Street during the first National Day of Action to draw attention to the opioid overdose epidemic, in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday February 21, 2017. Demonstrations were held in cities across the country to demand different levels of government take meaningful action to address the crisis by calling for an end to the war on drugs, the removal of barriers to health care including improved access to naloxone and opiate substitution therapy and the implementation of policies informed by drug users.


A man drinks a can of beer as another smokes a cigarette while watching people during a march on the first National Day of Action to draw attention to the opioid overdose epidemic, in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday February 21, 2017. Demonstrations were held in cities across the country to demand different levels of government take meaningful action to address the crisis by calling for an end to the war on drugs, the removal of barriers to health care including improved access to naloxone and opiate substitution therapy and the implementation of policies informed by drug users.


Steve Cardinal participates in a march on the first National Day of Action to draw attention to the opioid overdose epidemic, in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday February 21, 2017. Demonstrations were held in cities across the country to demand different levels of government take meaningful action to address the crisis by calling for an end to the war on drugs, the removal of barriers to health care including improved access to naloxone and opiate substitution therapy and the implementation of policies informed by drug users.


A man and woman kiss while participating in a march on the first National Day of Action to draw attention to the opioid overdose epidemic, in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday February 21, 2017. Demonstrations were held in cities across the country to demand different levels of government take meaningful action to address the crisis by calling for an end to the war on drugs, the removal of barriers to health care including improved access to naloxone and opiate substitution therapy and the implementation of policies informed by drug users.


A woman watches as people march down East Hastings Street during the first National Day of Action to draw attention to the opioid overdose epidemic, in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday February 21, 2017. Demonstrations were held in cities across the country to demand different levels of government take meaningful action to address the crisis by calling for an end to the war on drugs, the removal of barriers to health care including improved access to naloxone and opiate substitution therapy and the implementation of policies informed by drug users.


A woman, left, prepares to inject herself with an unknown substance as a man sits in a wheelchair outside Insite, the supervised consumption site, in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday February 21, 2017.


A woman sits on the ground after injecting herself with an unknown substance outside Insite, the supervised consumption site, in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday February 21, 2017.


People march down East Hastings Street during the first National Day of Action to draw attention to the opioid overdose epidemic, in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday February 21, 2017. Demonstrations were held in cities across the country to demand different levels of government take meaningful action to address the crisis by calling for an end to the war on drugs, the removal of barriers to health care including improved access to naloxone and opiate substitution therapy and the implementation of policies informed by drug users.


A man holds a sign during a march on the first National Day of Action to draw attention to the opioid overdose epidemic, in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday February 21, 2017. Demonstrations were held in cities across the country to demand different levels of government take meaningful action to address the crisis by calling for an end to the war on drugs, the removal of barriers to health care including improved access to naloxone and opiate substitution therapy and the implementation of policies informed by drug users.

3. Leah Hennel/Calgary Herald

Yahya Al Masalmeh and his wife Seham Talab celebrate their son Mohammad's first birthday at their home with family including youngest daughter Najat Al Masalmeh,8. Mohammad was the first baby born in the city to recent Syrian refugee parents.


Najat Al Masalmeh, 8, puts a party hat on her brother, Mohammad, during his first birthday party at their home. Mohammad was the first baby born in the city to recent Syrian refugee parents.


(No caption provided)


Syrian refugees Seham Talab gets her daughter Najat Al Masalmeh ready to celebrate the youngest family members first birthday.


Syrian refugees Najat Al Masalmeh, left, and sister Yasmin Al Masalmeh, look through photos at their home.


Yahya Al Masalmeh and his wife Seham Talab celebrate their son Mohammad's first birthday at their home with family. Mohammad was the first baby born in the city to recent Syrian refugee parents.


Seham Talab celebrates her son Mohammad's first birthday at their home with family. Mohammad was the first baby born in the city to Syrian refugee parents.


(No caption provided)


Syrian refugee Najat Al Masalmeh,8, has fun at her brothers birthday party.


Seham Talab gives her son Mohammad a drink of water during his  first birthday celebrations at their home with family. Mohammad was the first baby born in the city to recent Syrian refugee parents.


Some of the Syrian food served at Mohammad's first birthday.


Syrian refugees Seham Talab gets her daughter Najat Al Masalmeh ready to celebrate the youngest family members first birthday.


2017 CURRENT STANDINGS:                      MONTH…TOTAL


Darryl Dyck/Freelance…180…360
2. Ben Nelms/Freelance…260…300
3. Leah Hennel/Calgary Herald…140…280
4. Kevin Light/Freelance…40…160
5. Michelle Berg/The Star Phoenix...40...130
6. David Bloom/Edmonton Sun…40…70
7. Jeff Mcintosh/The Canadian Press…40…70
8. Ian Martens/Lethbridge Herald…10…50
9. Crystal Schick/Moose Jaw Times-Herald…50…50
10. Jay Wallace/ISN…0…50
11. Chad Hipolito/Freelance…0…40








3
Contest Information / February West Clips 2017 Results
« Last post by Chad Hipolito on April 20, 2017, 08:27 PM »
Judges

Chicago Tribune photo department

Brian Cassella, John J. Kim, Alyssa Pointer and Peter Tsai


Photographers-18
Feature-60
News-20
Sports-34
Spot News- 12
Portrait-27
Multi-Photo-6 entries/79 photos



FEATURE

Comments: The eagle with the talons in attack mode was particularly dramatic. The dog in goggles was a nice found moment. We liked the graphic composition of the surfers.


1. Ben Nelms/Freelance

DELTA, B.C .: FEBRUARY 17, 2017 -- Juvenile Bald Eagles fight over food in Delta, British Columbia on February 17, 2017. Unseasonably cold weather forced large groups of eagles to feed on compost scraps in urban areas in the greater Vancouver area.

 2. Jeff Mcintosh/The Canadian Press

A man and his dog tour snowy streets in a motorcycle and sidecar on a cold winter day in Cranbrook, B.C., Friday, Feb. 3, 2017. Temperatures in the -10C range are expected with light snowfall into the weekend for the Cranbrook region.

3. Kevin Light/Freelance

A group prepares for an early morning surf session on Chesterman Beach in Tofino, British Columbia Canada on February 20th, 2017.

H.M. Leah Hennel/Calgary Herald

Hanna Al Aalak waits on Stephen Avenue on Tuesday February 14, 2017, to give her girlfriend a Valentine's Day balloon.

H.M. Leah Hennel/Calgary Herald

Members of Fish and Wildlife warm up in the hot tub after taking an icy dip during the Polar Plunge on February 25, 2017, in support of Special Olympics.



NEWS

Comments: Nice found moment during the protest. Nice light on the city prayer. We liked several images that felt more like features.


1. Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press

A man and woman kiss while participating in a march on the first National Day of Action to draw attention to the opioid overdose epidemic, in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday February 21, 2017. Demonstrations were held in cities across the country to demand different levels of government take meaningful action to address the crisis by calling for an end to the war on drugs, the removal of barriers to health care including improved access to naloxone and opiate substitution therapy and the implementation of policies informed by drug users.

 2. Leah Hennel/Postmedia

Members of the Muslim community pray outside Calgary Courts Centre in Calgary, Alta., on Friday February 10, 2017, in support of a member of the Calgary Islamic community who they say is banned from prayer halls by the Muslim Council of Calgary.

3. Ben Nelms/Freelance

Donald Trump Jr. jokes with his wife Vanessa Trump with scissors before cutting a ribbon to official open the Trump International Hotel & Tower in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, on Tuesday, February 28, 2017.

H.M. Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press

A man drinks a can of beer as another smokes a cigarette while watching people during a march on the first National Day of Action to draw attention to the opioid overdose epidemic, in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday February 21, 2017. Demonstrations were held in cities across the country to demand different levels of government take meaningful action to address the crisis by calling for an end to the war on drugs, the removal of barriers to health care including improved access to naloxone and opiate substitution therapy and the implementation of policies informed by drug users.

H.M. Ian Martens/Lethbridge Herald

Jack Stevens and Jared Boucher slide by Chris Jorgensen as they train under the watchful eye of John Kesslar as Lethbridge Fire and Emergency Services’ water rescue team took part in an ice rescue training exercise Wednesday at Henderson Lake.



SPORTS

Comments: The rugby at night made a great scenic. Several nice hockey action moments. The skijordue was a great unexpected find that needed a little bit better composition.

1. Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press

Steam rises as Canada's Gordon McRorie (21) carries the ball during the second half of an Americas Rugby Championship test match against the United States in Burnaby, B.C., on Saturday February 18, 2017.

 2. David Bloom/Postmedia

The Edmonton Oil Kings' Kobe Mohr (18) battles the Kootenay Ice's Kurtis Rutledge (3) during first period WHL action at Rogers Place, in Edmonton Wednesday Feb. 15, 2017.

3. Ben Nelms/The Canadian Press

Vancouver Canucks' Ryan Miller's (30) mask is knocked off of his head after getting hit by a shot from the Calgary Flames during first period NHL hockey action in Vancouver on Saturday, February 18, 2017.

H.M. Kevin Light/Freelance

Conor Keys of Canada is sandwiched between Argentina's Juan Cruz Guillemain, left, and Pedro Ortega, right, as he reaches for the ball during an Americas Rugby Championship match in Langford, British Columbia on February 4, 2017.

H.M. Leah Hennel/Calgary Herald

 James Kidd, left, is pulled by cowboy Tom Erikson on Bullseye during skijordue at The Polo Club.



PORTRAIT

 Comments: Several strong contenders here. We liked the light and graphic composition in each of the first two winners. The dog licking the woman’s face added a fun moment.


1. Ben Nelms/The Globe and Mail

Teacher Terry Stanway is pictured outside Vancouver Technical Secondary in Vancouver, British Columbia on February 21, 2017.

2. Leah Hennel/Calgary Herald

Roy Jr. on his grandparents ranch.

3. Darryl Dyck/The Globe and Mail

Melody Cooper, 41, holds her dog Squeak in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver. Ms. Cooper, who has been using drugs since she was 27, is now receiving hydromorphone - a licensed medication that can be used off-label as an addiction treatment - and says it has changed her life. (Held For February Publication)

H.M. Lyle Aspinall/Postmedia

International Festival of Animated Objects founder Xstine Cook and Executive Director Peter Balkwill pose for a photo at the Old Trout Puppet Workshop in Calgary, Alta., on Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017. The festival of puppetry runs March 16 and 17.



SPOT NEWS

Comments: Exceptionally strong work from the border. We liked both of the first two winners as well as the footprints in the snow. Several of the other contenders could have used tighter crops .[/i]


1. Ben Nelms/Freelance

A man and woman with Turkish passports are taken into custody by Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) officers after illegally walking across the U.S.-Canada border into Surrey, British Columbia February 25, 2017. 

2. Ben Nelms/Freelance

A family from Iraq taken into custody by Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) officers after walking across the U.S.-Canada border into Surrey, British Columbia February 26, 2017.

3. Michelle Berg/The Star Phoenix

A mother picks up her daughter from a classmate's home that served as shelter after their school bus set fire on Macdermid Crescent in Saskatoon on February 14, 2017. All four children and bus driver made it safely off the bus as it filled with smoke before it went up in flames.

H.M. Ben Nelms/Reuters

The footsteps of a man and woman with Turkish passports who crossed the U.S-Canada border in the frost into Surrey, British Columbia February 25, 2017. The two were later taken into custody by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) after being located.

H.M. Michelle Berg/The Star Phoenix

Blanche Wilson and Jim Wilson carry their pet birds and dog Luna away from their neighbour's house fire on Grant Street which was filling their home with smoke in Saskatoon on February 8, 2017.



4
General Discussion / NPAC Conference - Official Programme for 2017!!!
« Last post by Ali Ledgerwood on April 19, 2017, 09:50 PM »
Hi everyone,

Please download the official conference programme for the 10 Year Celebration of all things Photojournalism!

There are lots to take in over the course of the weekend and we really look forward to having you there.

Here is to 2017 and beyond!
5
Hi everyone,

Thrilled to announce the 7th speaker at the NPAC's annual conference, trade show and National Pictures of the Year Awards. 

Neil Ever Osborne is a Toronto-based visual storyteller who uses conservation photography and film-making to express the relationship between people and the planet. He works principally in wild spaces and in places that need protection while seeking out the human narratives unfolding in these lands and seascapes. Neil’s editorial assignments and commissioned works are completed in close collaboration with domestic and international publications, NGOs, corporations, philanthropists, and with a growing community of online advocates.

He is a Photographer-in-Residence with Canadian Geographic, a Nikon Ambassador, an Associate Fellow with the International League of Conservation Photographers, and a Fellow with The Royal Canadian Geographical Society (RCGS).

Neil is based out of the Evermaven studio in Toronto, Ontario, Canada when not in the field.

Talk Summary:
Conservation photography is really about the actions a photographer takes after the images have been made. The real responsibility starts after the shutter has been tripped. It is about getting your images in front of the influential people that really need to see them. What can you do to get involved?
6
General Discussion / Re: NPAC Swap n' Shop
« Last post by Ali Ledgerwood on April 13, 2017, 12:03 PM »
Hi Dave,

I have had some interest, but it's always so hard to tell.  This is the first year we've done this, so I'm a newbie at it.  The bonus is if you bring it in, you can get the sensors cleaned the next day at the Camera Clinics. :-)

I'll leave it up to you, but if you keep me posted, then I can make a list of what's coming in and that might help the sales.

Cheers and super excited to see you!
Ali
7
General Discussion / Re: NPAC Swap n' Shop
« Last post by David Chidley on April 12, 2017, 10:41 PM »
Hi Ali, any interest by others?  I've got some stuff to sell.  I may post it in advance under Swap Shop forum with discounts for students.
8
General Discussion / Congratulations to the Nominees for the NPOY!
« Last post by Ali Ledgerwood on April 11, 2017, 04:09 PM »
Thrilled that NPAC got a great full page spread on the Globe and Mail today.

Another awesome reason to attend the CONTACT Photo Festival Opening night, NPAC Conference and NPOY.

Yes, journalism matters!

9
Hey all,

Excited to announce Patrick Murphy-Racey as NPAC's speaker at the NPAC Conference, sponsored by Sony Canada.

Patrick Murphy-Racey has always tried to stay on the edge of photojournalism, using different tools, mediums, and moving in and out of editorial advertising, and now doing 4K video production work.  Everything ‘PM-R” does is informed by his PJ roots.  Patrick started in newspapers, moved into magazine work, has shot over 700 assignments for Sports Illustrated, and hundreds of other publications.  Patrick has been a self-employed photographer since 1992 and will share tips about not just surviving, but staying fresh and always re-inventing as he moves forward.  PM-R has ridden his motorcycle in every Province of Canada and knows how to say, “zed."
10
General Discussion / Illiberalism, Journalism needs to See Differently
« Last post by Ken Gigliotti on April 09, 2017, 01:08 PM »
Illiberalism vs Liberalism Rant; Journalism Could See Politics Differently

Illiberalism in the present definition would take the form of disillusioned liberals. Interestingly this group is not far right but just right of liberal and right of center. This is the mis-characterized group that is confusing mainstream media. It also includes more right leaning ,shinier fringe support that would attract visually media. The larger group could only be seen analytically. Liberal and conservative parties could capture parts of this demographic by moving toward the right with action plans and plans of action. Parties in power have the advantage.

This is a big deal change, where the mainstream party voters cancel each other out and niche groups can push a majority. Promises won't count with illiberals. 

George Orwell's Book 1984 describes three types groups of people. The “High” group that wants to stay in a leadership roll. The “Middle' group that wants to move into the “High” groups position , and the “Low”the bottom  group that is “too much crushed by drudgery ...is to abolish all distinctions and create a society in which all men shall be equal.” (written in 1948)

Recent votes in Britain to leave the European Union and the 2016 US election that made Donald Trump president and the so called (mis-read) rise of the right in up coming national elections point to a blowing off steam by the Low groups. The Low groups have reclaimed  minority leverage in polarized political environments.
The power of the vote stands true although purity of the vote is being tested by powerful , disruptive outside influences.

The “Low” are standing up and want recognition. Scientific math forces are enabling political parties  to use advanced data  to harness these niche groups ,influencing  outcomes and move the political opposing forces of the “High” and “Middle” to SEE them.

Politics makes people mad and unpredictable. Unpredictable has to be redefined when high stakes politics are concerned. Unpredictable predictable. Orwell's “doublespeak”.

The “low” in Europe and the United States were mis-charaterized by media as “right wing ,and populous”,but it may be a group of people that had it's hopes raised too many times and it's arm twisted even more times. Certainly Europe's people are in the later, giving up too much for freedom of movement and self defense. Currency and sovereignty are history based cornerstones to individual culture and control. And then there is some getting too much from others in various ways with no end in sight. Bail outs and illiberalism go hand in hand. One hand may be clapping uncontrollably.

Illiberal-ism rises, and it is not fueled by the far right ,the far right may be a small visible and loud evidence that something different is going on. To be on the far right automatically makes the group small.

 
Remarkably ,Paul Ryan ,Republican Leader of the House of Representatives believes that the Republican Party could be a “workers party” in the next five years. This is illiberalism empowered by Trumps win by finding  significant tide turning niche voters in a close election. The next time will be different as competing parties would have made moves to the right of center instead of the left. Republicans would have to deliver. This would entail supporting safety nets for low income earners starting with health-care. This could morph and coincide with the beginning of massive job losses caused by the effects of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and massive automation.

Workers , spurred on by owners will be looking for serious help. Canada to.

An outside the box idea could make a political party a friend of the worker and of business. Workers and companies are  already partners, they may be desperate partners in an automated ,fast moving , globalized environment that pressures work forces and governments in developed countries. These groups are experiencing this second wave of job loss already but media has not noticed. The last election must have picked up an ambient pattern analytic to support such a bold move. The first time was a gamble, the math is getting an upgrade.

Trump group is morphing and media may be wrong again. Media for sure could invert sending eyes to custom news web sites of ideas and aspirations. Not newspapers or cable news. It is important that media get it right.

Checks, balances and conservative thinking may hinder the Trumps new family business. Instability in the world favours the Boss of everything.

Illiberal-isms anger and protest, it seems is  caused by the repeated over-promising of liberalism to desperate people then not delivering. Delivering liberalism unequally would be another trigger. Not having a job is motivation for change. The unintended unpredictable result may be an angry unpredictable electoral result. BREXIT,Trump.

This goal could embrace a (Canada) or USA first process to save American manufacturing jobs and companies while expanding and globalizing to new markets. There was a commentator who made the distinction between out-sourcing and globalization that sounded odd at the time ,I wish I could remember the name. I see now there could be distinction.

This is about timing and tipping points and what side workers want to be on. A political party that would deal with inevitable job loss without typically socialized welfare could be interesting. A made in America idea.

Canadians believe in taxation and  welfare, it has a powerful infrastructure within government that the “Low” sees only in the mere trickle down from the two higher groups.
The “Low” can still use their secret weapon once in every four years but the present choices  are indistinguishable.

What if desperate workers unite with desperate company managers and owners of small and medium sized business for mutual protection. In Canada the NDP may have a play with it's history with workers but not owners. Conservatives,business owners  and workers it is an interesting option. It is thinking differently.

Workers, managers and owners cannot be working against each other in this economic climate.

Illiberal-ism could drive it with a 30% Conservative base and a normally 20% undecided  or never voted before turnout. 

It hinges on a high profile Donald Trump's  ability  to create local jobs in the next four years. This should be just a head of the negatives effects of automation and a later the  AI contraction. In Canada with a devalued currency ,it may just be a matter of a decreased the business tax or just giving away money as a guaranteed annual income to be successful.

Inflation and interest rates and carbon tax  may be issues.

Since Donald Trump was elected president there has been a lot of talk about the rise of illiberal-ism. I had not heard that term before but my mind flashed back to the third high pay job I had when I was in my twenties. High pay jobs were abundant. I worked as a painter, paper mill labor , and terminal grain elevator labourer. The last two jobs have closed for good  in the last ten years.

I guess everyone starts out liberal, it is the affliction of the young as conservatism is the affliction of the old. A little known law of political physics states that anger cannot be consumed only transferred. Opportunity plays a big roll.

It may appear to some that government program employment initiatives cause bureaucracies to thrive and survive , but disappoint workers when the program ends.

The real failure of liberalism is not good intentions, but lack of tax dollars because there are so few working to support such costly systems. It has a good cover story.  A system that pays itself first.

Tax the robots?

In the mid 1970's I worked for a time  on the scale floor of Saskatchewan Pool 4 terminal elevator in Thunder Bay. The job was weighing and shipping grain to ships destined for eastern Canadian ports and the world. I just moved a spout from one bin to another. But, I worked with a crew of men that gave me my first glimpse into the minds of the illiberal's. Being a kid with a red hardhat, I was in awe of the practical clarity of thought I would experience . My next stop would involve a big pay cut to join the local  newspaper. At that time it held freedom of thought pretty dear but that would soon change. I would have to learn indirect ways of thinking in gradual stages over the next 40 years in the news business.

The day at the terminal elevator always started the same. A couple of newspapers  would show up and the scale operator and the government inspector would start going through the stories. The outrage would predictably  start over a court story, city hall , the provincial, federal bugling as well as international and sports stories. I would learn ,news makes people mad.

The narrative would usually outline a disagreeable action fallowed by an unsatisfactory response. The argument would continue until a solution was found and agreed upon. Unanimously  workers  agreed on a point that was always aspiration and surprisingly simple. The whole crew would agree and decide, “the bastards should be  shot” or “just shoot the ba*ta#ds.” They saw problems with clarity. It was always pretty funny ,the simplicity of it. By noon everyday the ba*t#rds were happily stacked like cord wood. They actually solved one of the world problems one day,but I forgot the solution. Cell phones had not been invented so I couldn't text the United Nations. Another big joke on the scale floor.

The guys at the elevator would love these modern classics.

Police are warning the public that a dangerous sexual offender is being released and is likely to re-offend. Good luck to all .

Or,  Fentanyl users, your product is in the mail ,we have paramedics standing by.

Then there was this. Orwell-ian , “telescreen”  screeching  out “newspeak” in terms of “doublethink.”

Form Washington D.C.,“Is there an is,” and, “there is no there,there.” Heads spin.

The Liberal feminist wife was criticized for displaying a photo on social media of her holding hands with her feminist husband and prime minister of Canada (who created a gender balanced  cabinet because it was 2016) on International Woman's Day 2017. The insult was further supported by a feminist, and reporter on the “telescreen,” news network by saying it ought not to have occurred on that day. That implied it would be OK on another day. Even the most illiberal would be left speechless by this entanglement. Except it is an illiberal expression of distrust. Cool, eh.

The person who designed terminal grain elevators had a castle in mind. They were big ,imposing , damp,dark, cement stone structures with 100ft bins and 150 ft. work houses and had a water mote on three sides. Sask Pool 4 was one of the most efficient operations on the harbor unloading 80 cars of grain a shift and shipping 100,000 bushels an hour to the boat. Everything and everyone born before political correctness are dinosaurs.

I was beginning to see that segments of the population do not always  “get” or buy-in to what was written in newspapers or heard on TV.

Il-liberalism can happen in Canada with the percent of overall taxation is 50%.  Those still working full and part time haven't had a raise in a decade. House prices rise, rental housing next. Workers see no cost of living increment and no hope for a raise while facing down sizing  or layoff in every quarter of every year while also being on the cusp of being replaced by a robot. The hollow middle class  with education debt are  working and sinking below the poverty line with their kids still in school.   

The beaten down newspaper industry has just joined the long drab line of people standing outside the parliament buildings with their hands out for tax dollars. It seems that the horse may be leaving the barn.

Large budgets for failing ministries and more taxation is on the way... yet the same problems do not get fixed and only get worse. Illiberal-ism rises . Illiberal-ism is not a new thing but the scale of it is increasing. Some may think it is new, or new to media or ignored by correctness rules of engagement  ,or now large enough  in scale that  media will misdiagnose, simplifying and call it racism, or hate  and find 2 experts  to quote  supporting the premise. More “cylindrical” political reporting.(another 1984 ,Orwell quote)

The next four years will put a spotlight national leadership. Traditional approaches may prevail. Crisis or not ,it all could be very interesting.

The deplorables may be winning as more and more attention is being paid to the next elections in Europe. They do not need to win ,they just demand to be noticed.
Opinion/rant by ken Gigliotti April 2017
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