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General Discussion / Canada 200- Aboriginal Issues and the Carbon Tax
« Last post by Ken Gigliotti on July 26, 2017, 12:19 PM »
Aboriginal Issues and the Carbon Tax  -Opinion by Ken Gigliotti

Canada 200 is just around the corner and one of Canada's biggest issues since Canada 100 is its relationship with First Nation people. The relationship has got worse. We can't blame Donald Trump for that one. We blame politics, we are just the taxpayer. The treasury department has developed an aboriginal bureaucracy to speak its own language back to itself. The mumble of bureaucracy has got louder and louder. Problems that were thought to addressed  get worse and worse at the grass roots level.

The media struggles. Canada's peace corps could be working ,just outside the fort. News photographers see things from many angles ,we also work just outside the fort of the newspaper industry.We have never been red coats or blue coats but we have worked for both. Our work is problem solving their thinking.

Problem solving must begin,first and foremost is in the hearts of Canadians. We must recognize that we are all Canadians. We all have a part to play. Going down the political path has led us too this terrible state were some parts of the population are beginning not to care. This is the most dangerous path.

The apology the federal government to aboriginal people fell short by a long shot. Little known facts about apology is they have three parts.
First a person has to recognize they were wrong, then they have to be sorry , after that is a pledge that it will not happen again. An apology is a pledge.

In general when looking at Aboriginal issues we see colour, if you take a colour blind approach the issues seem to become clearer.

Trust is a big issue , but it comes later, it is something that is hard to earn but is gone in a split second when betrayed. Lets leave trust out of it.

The Winnipeg issue with racism is less a problem that an issue of violence. Racism is more a product of segregation, something seen from a distance. The , First Nation Reserves ,the North End and inner city are more or less segregated zones that operate fairly smoothly until sexual abuse/spousal violence ,gangs, and drugs begin to win. These areas are filled with good people and they are working towards solutions in very creative ways.

Racism can be in someones heart and can be seen by that person as a problem  over there, not over here. It is virtual and vaporous.

Actual violence has deep consequence in violent acts, collateral damage and injury and death, long term implications jail ,recovery from injuries.
Actual violence is the biggest issue , and the mounting list of murdered and missing women  native and non native is a big number.

The political answer is more money for woman's problems. This treats the symptoms but not the cause. This approach gets good press for bureaucracies.

Injured people need help. But ,the cause needs to be addressed, men are the problem. Aboriginal and non aboriginal men need programs too, respect for women education should be mandatory in all schools starting in elementary systems. The education system needs to have programs that emphasize co operation and it needs to start early. Start with coed dance, people who dance learn to cooperate. It is the start ,boys need to be introduced to girls in a cooperative and meaningful way. High school is too late.Boys who do not dance end up drinking all night at parties as girls dance with each other. Their lives could be so different. Drinking/drugs  have already started , media especially music and video has has created negative and violent norms that without a strong base of knowledge  are impossible to counter act.

Men are the root problem, no need for a study. Fix men and everything falls into place.

First Nation men have the closest contact to native women and children, according to RCMP stats. Native women coming or fleeing First Nations get involved in the sex trade at younger and younger ages. The are men issues. The first Winnipeg aboriginal child street gang was said to have noble intentions , to protect the girls.
First Nations need safe house for women and children on reserve and in the city.

Security is more important than democracy, something we have learned  from refugees fleeing war in the Middle East.

Security in the North End is handled by city police but there are trust issues, but the Bear Clan as citizen patrol is offering a hands on , grass roots solution to security problems. The Bear Clans is a good defense against gangs,and gangs are known on almost every First Nation community and the drugs they bring make things even worse. Literally hockey bags of drugs are sent easy by commercial planes to the First Nations. Drug money and a literal sex trade for drugs is a destructive influence that needs a strong response in these very small communities were a small group of bullies can take over. The take over of First Nations by bullies has many side effects that include the forcible joining of gangs, forcible joining of the sex trade , drug abuse and suicide.
Children are driven to suicide by things very clear and present.

Men are the problem, men need help. This is another movement  from the city to the First Nation and its as hard to get rid of as TB and other European disease.

Housing and water. Housing has a shared Red/White colour scheme. Did I say scheme? Building lots have to be prepared before building can take place. This has been a stumbling block.

Lets bring a less colorful solution. Habitat for Humanity Housing has been very successful in Winnipeg's North End and sweat equity has been a big part , it stimulates volunteerism. A volunteer mounted training of local and a work ready Habitat veterans could be a Bear Clan like solution to house building in  remote First Nations. Temporary refugee like tent centers could be built for large groups of volunteers from the south, involving the army and air force as well as the navy .

Many houses can be built.

Financing should come from the Carbon Tax because real carbon saving could be realized by wind and solar/geothermal experiments on a large scale could be very successful , eliminating diesel currently needed. All First nations could benefit from the new tax.

These solutions would all take time , 50 years with a hard sundown clause and penalties are needed. Just thinking out loud. Opinion by Ken Gigliotti.   

 

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Quote from: Ken Gigliotti
...most Canadians in no mood to celibate.

 ;D


Interesting taxi analogy. I bet an enterprising newspaper (are there any of these left?) could produce a good story around this.
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Canada 150: That Was Some Party:That White Man is Here to Help

News Photographers often see the wave tops of culture during our daily 4x30 minute relationships we have in the newspaper business. We take pictures for all departments and are chauffeuring  many reporters, dealing with many ideas. We are given the opportunity to see differently and without prejudice because we work in a structure that gives us very little power. I am not a historian just a P'ed off , rambling, retired person now. Political messaging, strange commercial media/politics , and many young voters ripe for manipulation,they won't have a chance to be their best selves.

It is said that television introduced  Americans to each other. The internet is introducing  the people of the world to each other. The continental plates of culture are moving towards each other with increasing speed, this movement is unstoppable. Completely new lines of power are forming that will have profound effects on every single person and the planet itself.

Fools around the world are finding each other also, because of this we as a nation need to our best selves.
Three stories in The Atlantic July /Aug 2017 when spliced together offer hybrid thinking ,a re-thinking major political parties in the US are considering. Media in Canada will have to catch up to some very strange  ideas about politics and power. The three stories come from the left, far right and a look at modern unions.  Some new research in the US is trying to understand Donald Trumps success will shed some light on how the next  government can be good again.
What's Wrong with the Democrats by Franklin Foer; the Democrats led by Hillary Clinton believed “A democratic wave ... would carry the party to victory, and liberalism to generate advantage.” The Democrats used a shy researcher Stanley Greenberg  to study  Macomb county near Detroit to monitor the white working class.Macomb grew distant from the “democratic” party and then furious with it.” after many elections supporting the New Deal to JFK. The findings shed new light that refutes 1960 post Civil Rights racism. There is anger with change but people get used to change and anger shifts from blacks in the 1960's, yesterday Mexicans ,today it is refugees. The findings may point to less racially directed voting.It is more about anger and being ignored than race.

A Conservative Case for Unions Atlantic Magazine story by Jonathan Ruach talks about how labour unions operate in Europe. The Canada /US union model is out dated and based on a 1950' s locally owned companies. Companies can just move if costs got to high. In Europe unions are doing different things , and still representing work forces instead of workers. This idea of recharging the union movement would have a colour blind solution for angry left behind workers.

The third story The Architect of the Right By Sam Tanenhaus, about an anti government ,Noble Prize winning economist of the 1950's and 60's who called Social Security a “ponzi scheme” , he theorized about the government obstructionism (now being done  by both parties in the US). He is against the “misguided good Samaritism ,which , by helping the unlucky, cushions them against the consequences of their bad choices.” This is not to be read by Canadian politicos , an open mind is needed. This brings people to make the changes that empower themselves and not let the state offer low grade social programs meant to stagnate populations.It brings a young persons thinking about what to do next.
For those who study politics , they will hear only dog whistles but the new way of thinking comes  from the combinations of ideas seen by new eyes not burdened by political dogma. It is happening in France with it's new rookie leader.

This is more a critical thinkers exercise. Canadians sincerely believe in consensus , but the end result is a 50-60% solution that degrades over time or political whim to 40-50% outcome. This is a bigness of country and a smallness of taxpayer issue. Our ministries , infrastructure , services have these low average outcomes from heath care, human services to basic roadwork .
There are other lines of thought that do not settle, they involve exceptionalism as a goal. It is a good goal. We are seeing the fruits of consensus politics and they are lacking.
 Canada was formed by mass ,unstoppable migrations of people , and First Nations people were in their path.  .

But let us celibate Canada 150.
Na, we just can't do that.
Just smile and say SORRY.

Canada's big birthday has caused Canadians to question themselves and  the power centres pushing them. The CBC is one of those power structures.

Could the long term goal of the CBC be, to please return  ALL of the missing parts of Canadian history for Canada 200 celebrations. The CBC is a powerful cultural force ,maybe too powerful in Canada.

Some of the best people I ever knew also suffered and over came, creating a positive legacy in this great country from 1900 to this day. To all Canadians this is personal now.
We are becoming American-like as we descend into culture change and hate. Racism is not the prime motivation, but traditional media is reckless  with the terms.

Canada was formed by mass ,unstoppable migrations of fleeing poor people seeking safety, and First Nations people were in their path. During most of the last 9000 years including the 19th and 20th century aboriginal people were independent and self sufficient.

  The CBC's dramatic narration of Canadian history, a ten part series ,mostly narrated by actors (over acted and supporting the arts,  gooey like old USSR propaganda ) called The Story of Us was released just before aboriginal protests filled the news days before Canada Day 2017 ,Canada's 150 birthday.

It really put most Canadians in no mood to celibate. Many people I talked to were bewildered and saddened by the content and that expensive day. Canada Day would never be the same.

The retirement of CBC icon Peter Mansbridge on Canada Day and the all day coverage of his legacy ,was another distraction over shadowing Canada's big birthday. That was disappointing it took up so much air time. The new nightly news format is a big improvement. The smugness meter is down to zero. Credit to the CBC in self improvement.
 
The strange thing is that Google did not come up with an easy slick-click answer for TV researchers on  how  Canada became such a great country despite many serious racist decisions by our own government over this countries short history. Centralized government bureaucracy is that bad guy. The times and context are not lost if we can see our history clearly from many angles.

TV researchers did not see the obvious, everywhere else on the planet was way worse.(Big Hint , the Nazis , Joseph Stalin, World Wars , Japan/China War ,American Civil War ,Slavery, American Indian Wars, Vietnam War, Diamond/resource wars in Africa, oil wars Middle East ,Famine in India , China ,USSR, Mao's Cultural Revolution, ETC. It's just HISTORY, the thing elitist don't teach anymore to us dumb ass rednecks. Canada does not need to act too proud nor stand too tall. We as a people,were the good people most of the time. Our flawed British background ,politics, the failure of, is also our history.It some how got a pass.

Canada's history with aboriginal people has been mostly unknown to the average person and the onus of guilt seems to be put directly on the average Canadian by the Corp.
The focus seems to be on the Residential School system but it goes back even further. The Indian Act set policy from what was the original 1% English colonial monarchy's ,the original powdered White man.

The Indian Act originally was the bringing together of other acts from British colonial policy (not just Canada but the realm) that dealt in destroying indigenous culture. Residential Schools for aboriginal children was a direct extension of British Colonial policy. British colonial policy was a direct expression of British race superiority over what they considered uncivilized nations. they managed to create parts of India in their own image.Canada would be another experiment but world wars got in the way.British culture dominated Canadian culture almost to the present with it's power over its age old enemy the French. French speaking people in Quebec evoked special status for Quebec and threatened its' own Qu-exit from Canada. Now the door is open for the entanglement aftermath of Nation to Nation special status for First Nations.

The policy of one Canadian simplifies action. There are just too many splinter groups seeking attention. Politics has made the mish mash ungovernable , one groups gets special attention at the expense of another. Everyone is now angry. This is the essence of the new reality , it lacks nuance but is very real.

And yet people struggle with the guilt, then get a little P'ed off when thinking back to grandparents in this country , I my case grandfather in early 1900 came from one the poorest parts of southern  Italy , my second grandparents arriving in Canada from  Polish /Ukrainian  after WW1. These were poor people who worked everyday , raised families and eventually owned their own homes. Yes ,there was no government act preventing them from owning land. My grandfathers English was poor up until he died  in his early 70's.And they were white.

They had no knowledge of government policy toward aboriginals in Canada at all. They did feel decriminalization and were suspicious of government. These people did not need or expect government to help them. Granted their children were loved and  never kidnapped by any bureaucratic policy conceived in Ottawa. Ukrainians were interned before my family arrived. In another apology by the Canadian government all was forgiven. A government reset. People still feel hurt for their families , they did not deserve that, neither do aboriginals today. 

Many other modern Canadians are migrants from Africa, South & Central  America, Asia and the Philippines they had no participation at all in this sad history , but know about sad histories from their own home lands. They may not feel like attaching tax dollars to that train either in the future. These people arrived with nothing and rose.

I was born in 1954,educated  in a Separate School (Catholic) and I remember aboriginal kids attending who were foster children of the Childrens Aid (1960's). The Separate Catholic School was funded by parishioners and paid less than the public schools and some of the teachers were Nun's ,the  priest was across the street in the church. The only abuse was a strict code of conduct and corporal punishment.  Corporal punishment was the norm and there was strict rules with no consideration for  ADHD or any of these modern afflictions , kids were just hit then expelled. Spare the rod and spoil the child was a common guiding principle. Again we went home everyday to our loving parents.

I worked all my life in news and only heard of the residential school scandal later in life.

Any way, Indian Affairs and the creators of the Indian Act seem to have got off pretty lightly. The churches both Catholic and Protestant ,not so much. The conditions for these atrocities were elemental in government all the way back to British rule by monarchs. This is documented.

Most Canadian immigrants were peasants and serf farmers fleeing over population ,war and famine in Europe and the Balkans during early part of the century , the World wars were big migrations. 

The essential questions about reconciliation have not been asked.

Does the average Canadian feel guilty for the  destructive policies against aboriginal people? Is anyone asking for a reset? Racism does exist but the friction comes mostly from ignored taxpayers about how their money is spent.

How is the money being spent? No one really knows ,not even the auditor general. I am sure aboriginal people and non aboriginal people are asking. I don't hear that question being asked by a shy media.Media is afraid of the answer.


What is the path from the tax payer to the individual reserve aboriginal person? How does it flow? Any charity can tell you how much of the money goes to the poor and how much is administration. This is a simple question but the lack of clarity evokes much distrust of government that is projected on impoverished native people.They do not deserve it.

Canadians sympathize  because our own migrating  families were once poor. This idea has been lost to some in 2017. Opportunities were offered and no one knows why aboriginal people stand in the same spot. These are valid questions  a compromised media are afraid to ask.   

Explain that, and we will find racism and hate at a much smaller scale than it is thought of today. We are in a politically contrived state in this climate of missing story elements and missing information. There is no critical thinking and our history is being revised. The truth is out there.

I do not hear anyone in media asking that question. I know that there are issues with speaking publicly in Canada about the issue. People are afraid to talk about native issues because media brands it racism. Political correctness at work.

Because of the highly developed welfare state , the taxpayer gets to have his say. The Taxpayer is suspicious of how money is spent. There has been disappointing  audits of Indian Affairs  money and accountability over a twenty year period. Jean Chretien started the ball rolling when threatened  one when he was a PM. He was also and former Indian Affairs minister for Pierre Elliott Trudeau's “Just Society” that created a White Paper in 1969 that would have created a multi cultural society , but in the process eliminated the word Indian  creating a new version of what some thought was aboriginal assimilation. He promoted the multi multiculturalism we have today but it would not have included special status for Quebec or nation to nation negotiations by anyone. There would be only one nation , one Canadian.  Geez how did that guy get elected in Canada? He could have been president.

But what is the context and the complete history? It is recorded and it isn't that complicated. It is political so it does not have a common sense thread. Google, Indian Act, Residential Schools history , British history ,White Paper 1961 ( it had to be“white”)
 
The impact of Canada's physical size, isolation and desolation and the severity of winter and the effectiveness of a government bureaucracy in Ottawa to create meaningful policy on the day to day governance of aboriginal people all factor into our collective history. Canada's people were self sufficient and did not want or need government to change that.

If the history, decade by decade of Indian Affairs (in its many name changes) proves anything, it is that no one should have it's day to day affairs governed by anyone in Ottawa.

*see Dances with Dependency -Out of Poverty Through Self Reliance by aboriginal author Calvin Helin , it is a history of modern aboriginal welfare created by the Government of Canada.(2006 Ravencrest Publishing)

The destructive effects of government policy , European disease, the Indian Act and the Residential schools , Hydro projects ,resulting movements of native people . This movement of people resulting in  generational  dependence on welfare  ending 9600 years of aboriginal self sufficiency starting in 1960. The author uses the word “welfare trap” and “forced dependency” in a very detailed account of this sad state of affairs inflicted on aboriginal people. This dependency strategy will create a “fiscal demographic tsunami on a scale never seen in Canada.” Helin is very blunt about doing nothing.


People were not complainers like they are today. But, aboriginal people could not speak English so they had to deal with Indian agents,and others who spoke for them. Not speaking English or French did not give First Nations people a voice. They could not talk to Ottawa. This was a valid point brought out in Farley Mowat's books in the 1950's. He also noted that many ministry people in the 1950's did not agree with Ottawa's policies towards the Inuit, they just kept quiet until their contract was up and tried to get a job the HBC. So the Ottawa bureaucracy could not get feed back from it's employees nor  the Inuit themselves. There was not direct information link , it was one way or the highway. Mowat is a controversial figure, but his books paint and authentic picture of day today Inuit life in the 1950's. He was there and not a lot of people have written about the subject at that time. Most of what people around the world  know about the Arctic and Inuit life are from his many books.

Maybe  someone at the CBC should find that “white man” everyone is talking about. He is not that hard to find. But, he is not every White Man in Canada, although everyone gets to wear it. Canada's story is the story of every family in Canada. Every Canadian in the first half of the 20th Century suffered the aftermath of two World Wars and the ten years of The Great Depression, these traumatic events occupied almost half an entire century.  Millions  Canadians who form this multicultural country would not arrive till decades later.

This was a country of very low wages until the 1970's. The tax base did not exist for the high minded ,well paid thinkers & civil servants of 2016.The country was built on peasant wages until recent years. The 1% had it pretty good from the very start in Canada.

There's a Syrian driving a cab,
Before that a Pakistani wearing a turban.
Then an Italian with a mustache was hailed.
In the beginning he was a big blonde guy named Mick.
They all took that wheel,
They drove customers in their cabs for cash.
They all felt diminished in every era.
In every era they rose.(by Ken Gigliotti)

Canadians got to know immigrants but they never got to know aboriginal people beyond those tortured banished souls occupying  main street of large western cities. These stateless groups numbering 50,000 in Winnipeg estimated by John Rogers founder of Main St. Project (and saver of thousands of lives)  in a public meeting during the 1980's.  Main Street Indians fell through the cracks back then as they were off reserve and not federal responsibility, but cities saw them as federal responsibility because they were First Nation , that Catch 22  loophole went on for decades. It was all highly visible on main street Canada and a strong bias was formed. That visual is hard to shake even though there is a large middle class of working aboriginal people ,many look just like the mainstream .

We search history trying to find that“white man,” everyone is talking about.
The ragged white guys seen in our history books seem to be serfs and peasant refugee farmers .They came from a feudal systems last gasp and famine and over population. These ragged white peasants fought European wars  ruled by kings .

They were ragged white men and they where also ruled. They were property ,they were small, they were taxed and they kept the the rich white men above them. These English serfs  tolerated being “loyal subjects”  persons ruled over by the divine right of  Kings. These subjects had no special status in Great Britain but carried special protection , they were declared above all other races they encountered in the world. They are like Americans today outside of the USA. They were protected subjects by British law.

White Europeans were an eclectic mix of enemies. The British were not “people ,persons” they liked institutions, architecture and  slavery. The Spanish were “people persons”they slaughtered an entire Central American  culture. The French were republicans ,thinkers & raiders, food and fashion. Every culture had its flaws. The Germans were ... busy.


 That British white man parsed power with a cleaver like a butcher with a cow. A serf ,peasant, adventurer, a subject  who could not be bested by his historic and geographical birth right. It is still just grade 4 social studies. Every kid learns it. The old but primitive cultures existed along side refined ones, easy targets for the former. But still a kingly 1% in action all the way. This deep ethos of the cleaver created the roots for reform in every arena of politics today.

The subjects where poor and down trodden but they were above the others, prevailing thought of the powerful declared the uncivilized,the heathen , sub human and genetically inferior. The English , the French, Italian German and Spanish needed a border of cultural superiority. Even before there was genetics ,their powdered whiteness made them superior. Their rule was absolute using  powerful cannons , their  whiteness, testosterone and slave ships.

One percent White power controlled and influenced. Even the white mans female mates were graded as less, the cleaver made another cut. It was their whiteness and their steel. Then another cleaved cut  for every race colour and kind. The first born male ruled over a female born before a male in European family culture. The education,employment and the vote of females was banned. The genesis of a bigotry and injustice to race and gender was exported ,was formed in a war based culture from European monarchies. One and two hundred year old European culture resemble the Taliban of today.

White Women where the property of the male subjects who were property themselves. Divide and conquer, splintered ,all the groups still exists today in modern government , each one gets their own TV time and a ministry. It makes them happy and heard but they still stand in the same spot smiling for the better part of three centuries.

The cleaving of aboriginal culture by blood was raised to a high art. And It was profitable , the aboriginal fur trade was a low cost money maker but also a lynch pin to culture. When taken away the culture began to unravel. The Hudson Bay Company predated government in the most isolated parts of Canada.
Yankee Whalers decimated the Inuit culture in a whirl wind till 1900. All for profit, a business arrangement , fur for flour, a gun , some bullets. Oh yea, you will need more bullets.

The white man clung to power,delaying and placating  in mysterious and magical ways. Judo of insecurity. They made the rules, laws, education ,institutions and churches.  The great white man's 1% always had a plan while everyone else toiled busily with the mindless urgency the plan allowed. The promise ,like heaven , in the far future. Happiness became further and further away. Winter first , then spring. Over promise and ever so slowly  under deliver. A perfect plan for the ages.

Institutional liberalism was young and reforming institutions. And still to this day Indian Affairs cannot built, or does not know if it built  a budgeted house with water and sewer for First nation people even though  the homes of whites living on reserves (police,  nurses, teachers and doctors) are all serviced.
Remote Hydro dam projects in the north have built from scratch, serviced communities of 1500 people with a common food service. I have worked in bush camps in the 1970's some were simple 60 man bunkhouses , another was built like a resort to be used as hunting lodges .These camps can be built to be anything. A seniors home for elders jumps to mind. Quick and easy. One Manitoba reserve is building tiny houses for single and couples , $10,000 each. Creative.

It would not be until modern times that the infrastructure of the welfare state would create jobs and a middle class for aboriginal people to manage the sorrow as well as the rebirth of their own people. Servicing the sorrow is a real driver of jobs with no real reason to suppress the sorrow. Addictions, social services , jail & justice, child welfare, sex trade , jobs, jobs jobs, and still , people on western reserves are the poorest people in Canada. Billions spent every years.

We must be seeing that comets tail as politics is moving to a more urgent and accountable present. Both white , migrant and First Nations people want to see where the money is going.

Political accountability is near.

The white man sees himself in the global mirror and is ashamed even though everything has gone to his centuries old colonial plan. The rest begin to rise slowly but they begin to rise ,faster and faster. Destabilizing wars cannot come fast enough for the 1% white man now. The Doctrine of Air Power creates many new enemy fighters with every guided bomb.

In the end the white mans globalized industrial plan has brought only sadness, anger insecurity and a damaged planet.

Today's Racism as defined by the white man as he creates the last stall to progress. Reconciliation and an end to racism may be the only thing that can save this North American experiment. The white man now has many enemies,the security of our culture depends of being that shining city on the hill to all of humanity. 

The current thread of cultural correctness and social engineering by both government and now media is failing , voters are angry. It would be good to find out why.In the United States much thought is going into that project.

For those who study politics , they will hear only dog whistles but the new way of thinking comes from the combinations of ideas seen by new eyes not burdened by political dogma.

Canada 200 is just around the corner. Opinion by Ken Gigliotti

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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General Discussion / Advertising photos as news
« Last post by Warren Toda on July 20, 2017, 03:49 PM »
The Globe and Mail today tried to pass off an advertising photo (a picture of musician John Mayer posing with a glass of beer) as a news photo (page L3).

You'd think the photo credit of "Bud Light" would've tipped off The Globe's page editor. Or maybe the very noticeable "BUD LIGHT" near the middle of the picture might've raised suspicion.  Other photographers at the exact same shoot didn't get any beer logos in their pictures but maybe they were only photojournalists.

Perhaps no one considers the entertainment section to be news and no one cares. Certainly some newspapers' entertainment, business, lifestyle and other non-front sections play fast and loose with (photo)journalism ethics.

Some of the problem is Getty Images which dabbles in editorial, commercial and PR photography and then passes it all off as editorial since Getty can make more money that way.

When Company A hires Photographer X to shoot a product image and then pays Photographer X's employer to distribute that picture, that's an advertisement.

Why is there no "Advertisement" disclaimer above such photos exactly the same way a disclaimer is placed on print ads that look like editorial?
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General Discussion / Re: Copyright and monkeys
« Last post by Dominic Chan on July 15, 2017, 04:10 PM »
So the bottom line is the photographer/creator/artist and all the middle persons involve are just blood suckers making the money off without doing a thing.
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General Discussion / Re: Copyright and monkeys
« Last post by Warren Toda on July 13, 2017, 09:12 PM »
Perhaps not entirely a copyright story and there doesn't appear to be any monkeys involved but here's an interesting news article about an Annie Leibovitz collection that was donated to the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia in 2013 but has yet to be put on public display.

You need to read the entire article to understand what exactly has happened:

1) A Toronto family or, at least, a company controlled by that family, purchased a large collection of Leibovitz images in 2013 for $4.75M (US) and then immediately donated the collection to the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia.

2) The art gallery then tried to get the collection certified for about $20M (CAD?). The family that donated the images would've received a tax credit based on the certified value rather than the actual purchase price. (It's not uncommon for the purchase price of a piece of art to be less than its appraised value).

3) The Canadian Cultural Property Export Review Board refused to certify most of the images and gave the remaining photos a total fair market value of $1.6M (CAD?)

4) Leibovitz has been paid only half of the $4.75M US purchase price. The other half was to be paid after the collection was certified at the hoped-for $20M.


The notable copyright issue is that Leibovitz has maintained copyright of the sold collection and has control over how the images are displayed and marketed.
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Contest Information / May West Clips 2017 Results
« Last post by Chad Hipolito on July 13, 2017, 05:23 PM »
Judges

The Dallas Morning News

Ashley Landis, Staff Photographer
Rose Baca, Staff Photographer
Tom Fox, Staff Photographer




Photographers-17
Feature-58
News-19
Sports-28
Spot News- 13
Portrait-26
Multi-Photo-9 entries/125 photos



FEATURE

Comments: A lot of wide ranging photos in this category. We chose a mix of moments and composition. 1. We really liked the friends photo.  The expressions on their faces combined with the mid-telephoto composition made for a compelling feature. 2. Great composition and framing made for a interesting feature of a cyclist crossing the bridge. 3. The photographer had the right moment with the river surfer. We liked the loose crop with waves and the city in the background.


1. Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press

Maggy Gisle, right, and longtime friend Larissa Healey embrace after they bumped into each other in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday May 9, 2017. For 16 years, Gisle believed her lot in life was to be a "junkie, a prostitute and a drug dealer." She's now among a number of indigenous women increasingly frustrated about the lack of a clear timeline to share their stories with the much-anticipated national public inquiry.

2. Kevin Light/Freelance

A cyclist rides underneath the Crowchild Trail bridge along the Bow River Pathway in Calgary, Alberta on May 5th, 2017.

3. Kevin Light/Freelance

River surfer Ryan Morstad leaps from a rock with his surfboard and onto a man made standing wave beside the Tenth Street bridge on the Bow River in Calgary, Alberta on May 5th, 2017.

H.M. Chad Hipolito/The Globe and Mail

A young girl makes her way up the stairs of the Legislative Library of British Columbia in Victoria, B.C., on Monday, May 12, 2017.



NEWS

Comments: 1. At first glance we almost overlooked this frame of John Horgan’s bus missing the mark. When we went back to look at what was happening, we appreciated the moment and the composition. 2. Nice fire training photo. Good action and impact. 3. Moody moment with that red light. Nice to see it cropped tight.


1. Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press

The driver of a relief bus that was called in watches as a tow truck operator tries to free NDP Leader John Horgan's campaign bus after it became stuck while trying to exit a parking lot in Surrey, B.C., on Monday May 8, 2017. A provincial election will be held on Tuesday.

2. Michelle Berg/The Star Phoenix

Fire and Rescue practice their skills using the Saskatoon Fire Department Rescue Craft in the challenging environment created by the weir in Saskatoon on May 16, 2017.

3. Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press

NDP supporter Christine Martin watches results at NDP election night headquarters in Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday May 9, 2017. Results were too close to call with no party winning a majority of the seats in the provincial election.



SPORTS

Comments: A great set of high impact sports moments quickly rose to the top of the list. We all had different thoughts about 1st, 2nd 3rd.  1. Really nice rugby stiff arm to the face.  Elevated angle made for a clean background. Nice light didn’t hurt either. 2. The poor Cowboy got the flat end of the bronc. We were hoping that guy was able to walk away after being trampled. 3. Nice open ice hockey check. Clean background at event level made this photo easy to read. 


1. Chad Hipolito/The Canadian Press

Team Canada's Julia Greenshields takes a hand to the face from Team Russia's Anna Minislamova at the HSBC Canada Women's Sevens at Westhills Stadium in Langford, B.C., on Saturday, May 27, 2017. Team Canada improves to 3-0 on day one of the tournament winning 24-10 over Team Russia.

 2. Nick Didlick/Freelance

Falkland , British Columbia, Canada - Friday April 21, 2017:  Cowboy Dawson Hay from Wildwood Alberta gets stomped on by his ride during the 99th Annual Falkland Stampede.

3. Jeff Mcintosh/The Canadian Press

Edmonton Oilers defenceman Matthew Benning (83) hits Anaheim Ducks right wing Corey Perry (10) during first period NHL hockey round two playoff action in Edmonton on Wednesday, May 3, 2017.



PORTRAIT

Comments: There were some good images here but a lot of them lacked a back story to them. The images we chose were not only nice but they told a story about the person. 1. Just when I say that, this image didn’t have the woman’s name but we had seen the story in another category so we could figure it out. The image really stood out to us for it’s mood and clean composition. 2. Nicely composed and thought out. The low angle and reflection really made this portrait stand out. 3. Really nice, in the moment, photo of Drag queen Iona Whipp.


1. Leah Hennel/Calgary Herald

A young girl poses for a portrait after a day of branding on the hutterite colony.

2. Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press

Troy, of Parksville, B.C., who wished to be identified only by his first name, plays a guitar as he sits for a photograph on the beach at the Sunshine Coast Health Centre in Powell River, B.C. He lost his marriage and a multimillion-dollar business after developing an opioid dependency from post-surgery prescriptions and has attended the facility four times since 2009. Two years ago, his addiction spiralled into using heroin. (Held for May Publication date)

3. Michelle Berg/The Star Phoenix

Drag queen Iona Whipp sprays her hair after the three-hour transformation into Aron DoSouto's performance alter ego at her home in Saskatoon on May 18, 2017. In a small room painted a deep purple (chosen for its name, Fashionista), he has everything he needs to make the “confident, straightforward, very flirtatious” character come to life.



SPOT NEWS

Comments: Not the strongest category. Lots of car accidents. 1. Chose this because the photographer worked at making something a little different than just being there at a brush fire.  2 and 3. Cops and fireman standing around wrecked vehicles.


1.  Kayle Neis/Saskatoon StarPhoenix

Saskatoon Fire Department responds to a large brush fire outside the city off highway 11 in Saskatoon, SK on Saturday, May 6, 2017.

2. Tijana Martin/The Lethbridge Herald

Members of the Coaldale RCMP investigate a serious vehicle collision involving a pickup truck and a semi truck hauling a tandem trailer along Highway 5, just south of Lethbridge on Tuesday, May 16, 2017.

3. Tijana Martin/The Lethbridge Herald

Members of the Coaldale RCMP and Lethbridge Fire and Emergency Services investigate a serious vehicle collision involving a pickup truck and a semi truck hauling a tandem trailer along Highway 5, just south of Lethbridge on Tuesday, May 16, 2017.along Highway 5 on Tuesday, May 16, 2017.


MULTI-PHOTO

Comments: 1. A very creative look of a political campaign.  Lots of fresh and surprising images. 2. Nice look at the Canadian rugby team and the 7’s tourney. Would like to have seen a tighter edit and consistent toning. 3. Once again a little tighter edit would have helped. Nice work by the photographer looking for creative angles and composition. Some worked, others didn’t.


1. Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press

NDP Leader John Horgan boards a plane at Vancouver International Airport in Richmond, B.C., on Friday May 5, 2017, to fly to Nanaimo for provincial election campaign stops on Vancouver Island.


NDP Leader John Horgan holds a sign and shakes a noisemaker during a roadside campaign rally in Surrey, B.C., on Monday May 8, 2017. A provincial election will be held on Tuesday.


NDP Leader John Horgan addresses supporters during a campaign rally in Courtenay, B.C., on Friday May 5, 2017.


B.C. NDP Leader John Horgan addresses supporters during a campaign rally in Courtenay, B.C., on Friday May 5, 2017.


NDP Leader John Horgan, centre, wears a firefighter's uniform and holds an axe after delivering doughnuts to a fire hall to mark International Firefighters' Day, during a campaign stop in Vancouver, B.C., on Thursday May 4, 2017.


NDP Leader John Horgan walks past a photo of himself on the side of his campaign bus during a campaign stop at a supporter's home in Richmond, B.C., on Thursday May 4, 2017.


B.C. NDP Leader John Horgan is framed by tulips as he walks back to his campaign bus after driving voters to a polling station to vote in the provincial election, in Coqutilam, B.C., on Tuesday May 9, 2017.


An NDP supporter holds a sign reading "700,000 Without a Family Doctor", that the party says represents the number of people in the province without a family doctor, while listening to Leader John Horgan speak during a campaign stop in Kamloops, B.C., on Tuesday May 2, 2017. A provincial election will be held on May 9.


NDP Leader John Horgan drinks a cup of coffee during a campaign stop at a diner in Kamloops, B.C., on Tuesday May 2, 2017.


A supporter holds a dog as NDP Leader John Horgan, second left, poses for photographs with a supporter during a campaign stop in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday May 7, 2017.


An NDP supporter holds a sign during a roadside campaign rally with Leader John Horgan in Surrey, B.C., on Monday May 8, 2017. A provincial election will be held on Tuesday.


The driver of a relief bus that was called in watches as a tow truck operator tries to free NDP Leader John Horgan's campaign bus after it became stuck while trying to exit a parking lot in Surrey, B.C., on Monday May 8, 2017.


An NDP supporter wears an orange hat adorned with buttons while listening to NDP Leader John Horgan during a campaign stop in Parksville, B.C., on Friday May 5, 2017.


B.C. NDP Leader John Horgan, right, listens as local resident Tony Zelko plays a squeezebox and sings "You Are My Sunshine" outside his home where Horgan's campaign bus had stopped to take a woman to an advance polling station to vote, in Osoyoos, B.C., on Saturday May 6, 2017. A provincial election will be held on Tuesday.


NDP Leader John Horgan takes a shot from behind his back while playing pool against a reporter during a dinner stop before a campaign event in Hope, B.C., on Tuesday May 2, 2017.


B.C. NDP Leader John Horgan and his wife Ellie kiss while waiting after bringing voters to a polling station to vote in the provincial election, in Coqutilam, B.C., on Tuesday May 9, 2017.


NDP supporter Christine Martin watches results at NDP election night headquarters in Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday May 9, 2017. Results were too close to call with no party winning a majority of the seats in the provincial election.


A young girl sleeps as the clock nears midnight as NDP supporters watch results at NDP election night headquarters in Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday May 9, 2017.


NDP Leader John Horgan leaves the stage after addressing supporters in Vancouver, B.C., in the early morning hours of Wednesday May 10, 2017. Results were too close to call with no party winning a majority of the seats in the provincial election.


British Columbia Premier Christy Clark pauses to read her notes while addressing MLAs during a caucus meeting at a hotel in Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday May 16, 2017.


2. Kevin Light/Freelance

Breanne Nicholas passes the ball during a training session at the Pacific Institute for Sports Excellence ahead of the HSBC World Rugby Women's Sevens Series in Langford, British Columbia Canada on Friday May 19th, 2017. The Olympic Bronze medalists from Canada are trying to become the first team in HSBC World Rugby Women's Sevens Series history to win an event at home but will have to make it past Rio Olympic Gold medalist powerhouse Australia and Olympic Silver Medalists New Zealand to accomplish their goal.


Natasha Watcham-Roy reaches for the ball during a training session at the Pacific Institute for Sports Excellence ahead of the HSBC World Rugby Women's Sevens Series in Langford, British Columbia Canada on Friday May 19th, 2017.


Ghislaine Landry, Brittany Benn, Jen Kish, Bianca Farella and Hannah Darling stand during the Canadian National anthem before their game versus New Zealand in the final of the HSBC World Rugby Women's Sevens Series in Langford, British Columbia Canada on Sunday May 28, 2017.


Team Canada runs onto the pitch prior to a 33-5 victory over England in a Quarter-Final match at the HSBC World Rugby Women's Sevens Series in Langford, British Columbia Canada on Sunday May 28, 2017.


Julia Greenshields of Canada has her throat grabbed by Brazilian Maira Behrendt during a preliminary match at the HSBC World Rugby Women's Sevens Series in Langford, British Columbia Canada on Sunday May 28, 2017. Canada went on to beat Brazil 33-5.


Canadian fans cheer as Canada runs onto the pitch prior to a 33-5 victory over England in a Quarter-Final match at the HSBC World Rugby Women's Sevens Series in Langford, British Columbia Canada on Sunday May 28, 2017.


Breanne Nicholas of Canada tackles her opponent to the ground during a 33-5 victory over England in a Quarter-Final match at the HSBC World Rugby Women's Sevens Series in Langford, British Columbia Canada on Sunday May 28, 2017.


Brittany Benn of Canada checks her nose for blood during a 33-0 victory over France at the HSBC World Rugby Women's  Sevens Series in Langford, British Columbia Canada on Saturday May 27, 2017.


Canada's Hannah Darling brought down by Russia's Alena Mikhaltsova just before reaching the goal line during a preliminary match at the World Rugby Sevens Series in Langford B.C. Canada on May 28, 2017. Canada beat Russia by a score of 24-10.


Jen Kiss of Canada sits on the bench during a preliminary match versus Brazil at the HSBC World Rugby Women's Sevens Series in Langford, British Columbia Canada on Sunday May 28, 2017. Kish wears a wrist band with the hashtag #RUCKCANCER in recognition of her father who in 2015 was diagnosed with cancer and spent a month in hospital recovering after having a massive tumour removed from his stomach.


Charity Williams scores a try for Canada during a preliminary match at the HSBC World Rugby Women's Sevens Series in Langford, British Columbia Canada on Sunday May 28, 2017. Canada went on to beat Brazil 33-5.


Jen Kish of Canada celebrates a 17-10 victory over Australia in a Semi-Final match at the HSBC World Rugby Women's Sevens Series in Langford, British Columbia Canada on Sunday May 28, 2017.


Charlotte Caslick of Australia removes the ribbons from her hair following a 17-10 loss to Canada in the Semi-Final match at the HSBC World Rugby Women's Sevens Series in Langford, British Columbia Canada on Sunday May 28, 2017.


Team Canada walks over a bridge and back to their locker room after beating Australia 17-10 in the Semi-Final match at the HSBC World Rugby Women's Sevens Series in Langford, British Columbia Canada on Sunday May 28, 2017.


Natasha Watcham-Roy of Canada reaches for the ball versus New Zealand but the Kiwi's proved too tough beating Canada 17-7 in the final of the HSBC World Rugby Women's Sevens Series in Langford, British Columbia Canada on Sunday May 28, 2017.


Bianca Farella of Canada makes a run during a 17-7 loss to New Zealand in the final of the HSBC World Rugby Women's Sevens Series in Langford, British Columbia Canada on Sunday May 28, 2017.


New Zealand poses with the trophy after beating Canada 17-7 in the final of the HSBC World Rugby Women's Sevens Series in Langford, British Columbia Canada on Sunday May 28, 2017.


Jen Kish, Natasha Watcham-Roy and Brittany Benn of Canada react following a 17-7 loss to New Zealand in the final of the HSBC World Rugby Women's Sevens Series in Langford, British Columbia Canada on Sunday May 28, 2017.


New Zealand performs the Haka following their 17-7 victory over Canada in the final of the HSBC World Rugby Women's Sevens Series in Langford, British Columbia Canada on Sunday May 28, 2017.


Canadian Head coach John Tait receives a hug following his teams 17-7 loss to New Zealand in the final of the HSBC World Rugby Women's Sevens Series in Langford, British Columbia Canada on Sunday May 28, 2017.


3. Kevin Light/Freelance

Canadian National Junior Diving team member Bryden Hattie has his shoulders stretched out by a teammate prior to a training session at Saanich Commonwealth Place in Victoria B.C. Canada on May 25th, 2017.


Hattie warms up on a trampoline as his coach Tommy McLeod keeps an eye on his technique prior to a training session at Saanich Commonwealth Place on May 22nd, 2017. Hattie placed eighth at the 2016 World Junior Championships in Kazan, Russia in 2016.


Hattie warms up by executing various technical movements with his teammates prior to a training session at Saanich Commonwealth Place on May 25th, 2017. Hattie trains eight times a week, half of which is in the water  at Saanich Commonwealth Place and the rest dedicated to dryland, stretching and jumping exercises and lifting weights.


Hattie warms up on a dryland diving board as his coach Tommy McLeod watches his foot placement prior to a training session at Saanich Commonwealth Place on May 25th, 2017. McLeod was named Canadian Junior Diving Coach of the Year in 1998, 1999, 2003 and has coached over 20 Jr. National medalists, 10 Jr. International medalists, as well as  two-time Olympian Riley McCormick.


Hattie flips backward on a trampoline as younger kids watch prior to a training session at Saanich Commonwealth Place on May 25th, 2017. Dryland training for springboard and platform diving is vital for success and trampolines play an important role in skill development.


Hattie lands on a foam matt after performing a dryland dive prior to a training session at Saanich Commonwealth Place on May 22nd, 2017. During a three hour training session Hattie will spend 90 minutes on land followed by 90 minutes in the pool.


Hattie tests the stiffness of the board during a training session at Saanich Commonwealth Place on May 25th, 2017. Springboards are located either 1 or 3 metres above the water and to stiffen the spring a foot wheel located in the middle of the board is turned in a counter clockwise direction.


Canadian National Junior team member Bryden Hattie dives off a 1 metre springboard as his coach Tommy McLeod keeps an eye on his rotation during a training session at Saanich Commonwealth Place on May 25th, 2017. Hattie hopes to compete in the 2017 Junior World Championships improving on his 8th place 2016 finish.


Canadian National Junior team member Bryden Hattie dives off a 3 meter springboard during a training session at Saanich Commonwealth Place on May 22nd, 2017.


Canadian National Junior team member Bryden Hattie dives off a 3 meter springboard as his coach Tommy McLeod watches from the pool deck during a training session at Saanich Commonwealth Place on May 22nd, 2017.


Senior National team coach at the National Training Centre in Victoria Tommy McLeod gives feedback to Bryden Hattie during a training session at Saanich Commonwealth Place on May 25th, 2017.


Canadian National Junior team member Bryden Hattie performs a dive off a 1 metre springboard as his coach Tommy McLeod keeps an eye on his entry during a training session at Saanich Commonwealth Place on May 25th, 2017.



Canadian National Junior team member Bryden Hattie and his coach Tommy McLeod have a conversation during a training session at Saanich Commonwealth Place on May 22nd, 2017.


A large Canadian flag hangs in Saanich Commonwealth Place behind the 3 meter Springboards as Canadian National Junior team member Bryden Hattie towels off following a dive during a training session on May 25th, 2017.



2017 CURRENT STANDINGS:                      MONTH…TOTAL


1. Darryl Dyck/Freelance…220…880
2. Leah Hennel/Calgary Herald…50…600
3. Kevin Light/Freelance…140…450
4. Ben Nelms/Freelance…0…300
5. Michelle Berg/The Star Phoenix...70...240
6. Jeff Mcintosh/The Canadian Press…30…220
7. Chad Hipolito/Freelance…60…190
8. David Bloom/Edmonton Sun…0…180
9. Shane MacKichan/Freelance…0…130
10. Liam Richards/Saskatoon StarPhoenix...0...120
11. Jay Wallace/Freelance…0…100
12. Kayle Neis/Saskatoon StarPhoenix…50…80
13. Crystal Schick/Moose Jaw Times-Herald…0…80
14. Tijana Martin/The Lethbridge Herald…70…70
15. Ian Martens/Lethbridge Herald…0…50
16. Nick Didlick/Freelance…40…40






8
General Discussion / Copyright and monkeys
« Last post by Warren Toda on July 12, 2017, 09:14 PM »
An update to the long-running case of the British photographer who captured the now-famous "monkey selfie" pictures in 2011. The photographer is virtually penniless since some organizations and companies took control of his monkey photos claiming that either no one owns the copyright or the monkeys own the copyright.
9
General Discussion / Re: Get well soon Norm Betts
« Last post by Warren Toda on July 12, 2017, 01:53 AM »
It just happened again to Norm Betts. Apparently a cracked sternum and several broken ribs.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UHk6XD7d58Y" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UHk6XD7d58Y</a>

Betts was later quoted as saying, "I thought [the bull] had cleared and I was looking down at my cameras and that's the last I remember."
10
General Discussion / Re: Ontario's Protection of Public Participation Act
« Last post by Warren Toda on July 11, 2017, 03:46 AM »
Stacey Newman has been successful in her use of Ontario's anti-SLAPP legislation. The $16M defamation case against her has been dismissed and the case has set a legal precedent with regard to speech directed at a political candidate.

Newman said, "This was initially about the harassment I have had to deal with at the hands of a politician, but the decision is of importance to Canadian journalists and the protection of free speech."


Quote from: Warren Toda
The defamation suit must be dismissed under the PPPA if :

(note that I've phrased the last two tests slightly differently than the wording in the actual law so that all three tests are worded in the same affirmation which I think makes it easier to follow)

1) The proceeding arises from an expression made by Newman that relates to a matter of public interest.

AND

2) The defamation suit does *not* have substantial merit  OR  Newman has a valid defence.

OR

3) The harm likely to be or has been suffered by Rizvee is *not* sufficiently serious that the public interest in permitting the proceeding to continue does *not* outweigh the public interest in protecting that expression.

The judge ruled:

1) Yes, the matter was public interest.

2) The defamation suit did have merit BUT the other party failed to prove that Newman did not have a valid defence.

3) A judgement on this was not necessary because of the judge's ruling on #2. But the judge nevertheless still said, "... the Plaintiffs have provided no meaningful evidence of harm to their reputation attributable to the comments made by Ms. Newman." So basically, protecting Newman's right to free speech outweighed any public interest in allowing the defamation suit to proceed.


The judge also noted that the other party's claim for $16M suggested to him that "the Plaintiffs intended the claim to send a warning and related chill to Ms. Newman and others who might be inclined to comment against the Plaintiffs’ interests.  In defamation cases, there can be a wide range to the ultimate damages awarded.  However, on the face of this claim it is difficult to see how the Plaintiffs could quantify a $16 million damages award."


However the $1.5M suit against Newman for malicious prosecution is still ongoing. But Newman's lawyer was quoted as saying that the malicious prosecution claim is unlikely to succeed because the judge found there was no malice on the part of Newman.
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