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1
Swap Shop / Re: EF 24mm F1.4L Mk II
« Last post by Lyle Stafford on Today at 10:46 AM »
hi andrew,

do you still have the lens?

thx
lyle
2
Contest Information / March West Clips 2017 Results
« Last post by Chad Hipolito on May 26, 2017, 05:44 PM »
Judges

Lexington Herald-Leader 

Pablo Alcala-Staff Photographer
Charles Bertram-Staff Photographer
Ebony Cox- Intern and Western Kentucky University student




Photographers-18
Feature-55
News-13
Sports-31
Spot News- 14
Portrait-34
Multi-Photo-7 entries/70 photos



FEATURE

Comments: Very strong category. Too many nice pictures that didn’t get recognized.

Comments: very nice moment, great expressions, perfect timing
1. Kevin Light/Freelance

Rugby Canada 15's team member Julianne Zussman high fives with a young fan prior to an intra-squad trial game on the Shawnigan Lake School pitch in Shawnigan Lake B.C. on March 23, 2017.

 2. Jeff Mcintosh/Canadian Press Images

Young boys play soccer in the narrow streets on a quiet afternoon in Montserrat, Spain, Sunday, March 26, 2017.

3. David Bloom/Postmedia

A beam of sunlight highlights a pedestrian crossing 100 Street at 101A Avenue, in Edmonton on Sunday, March 26, 2017.


Comments: Different take on umbrella, nice use of light, layering and color

H.M. Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press

Pedestrians carrying umbrellas to shield themselves from the rain are seen through a cafe window covered with rain and steam in Vancouver, B.C., on Saturday March 11, 2017.

Comments: Seeing beyond the obvious
H.M. Lyle Aspinall/Postmedia

Kids watch warm maple syrup turn to taffy on ice during the Maple Festival des Sucres at Heritage Park in Calgary, Alta., on Saturday, March 4, 2017. It was the 15th year for the Association Canadienne-Française de l’Alberta to hold the festival in Calgary but the first year for complete integration with Heritage Park.



NEWS

Comments: Would have liked to have seen more variety in this category.


1. Jay Wallace/ISN

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is all smiles despite all of the angry pipeline protesters at Victoria City Hall, March 2nd 2017.

Comments: Nice find from press conference 
2. David Bloom/Postmedia

(left to right) Dressed in 1920's period costume Eliana Parade and Lauren Peters watch a $165 million expansion press conference announcement for Fort Edmonton Historical Park, in Edmonton Friday, March 3, 2017.

3. Lyle Aspinall/Postmedia

People cycle across the Peace Bridge in downtown Calgary, Alta., on Thursday, March 23, 2017. The initially-controversial bridge designed by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava, is hitting its fifth anniversary.



SPORTS

Comments: Also a strong category.

1. Leah Hennel/Calgary Herald

Roughnecks Curtis Dickson, right, scores on New England Black Wolves net minder Evan Kirk on Saturday March 25, 2017.

 2. Michelle Berg/The Star Phoenix

Yellowknife's Wren Acorn competes in the T2T - 13 female Champ 400 (100) semi-final during the Canada West Short Track Speed Skating Championship at SaskTel Centre in Saskatoon on March 19, 2017.

3. Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press

New Zealand's DJ Forbes, left, grabs England's Daniel Bibby by the foot but fails to stop him from scoring a try during World Rugby Sevens Series action, in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday March 12, 2017.

Comments: would have placed much higher if cropped better
H.M. Kevin Light/Freelance

The University of Victoria stroke man Taylor Perry lifts his arms along with his teammates in celebration after beating the University of British Columbia crew by two boat lengths finishing with a time of 10:37.60 to win the Brown Cup Regatta in Victoria, British Columbia Canada on March 25, 2017.



PORTRAIT

Comments:  Strong image of important subject matter
1. Leah Hennel/Calgary Herald

Elena Soare, 6, who came to Canada with her family from Romania, looks out the bus window during a new program being offered by Brewster travel Canada where they take newcomers to see the Rockies for the first time.


Comments: Great access to tough subject,  nice moment
2. Chad Hipolito/The Globe and Mail

Noreen Begoray was living in her car with her two dogs Gypsy and Kako for nearly a year and is now living in her own bachelor apartment in Victoria, B.C., Tuesday, March 29, 2017.

3. Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press

Nectar Yoga B&B owner Andrea Clark poses for a photo while practicing yoga in the geodesic dome at her property on Bowen Island, B.C., on Sunday March 26, 2017. The story of Nectar Yoga B&B begins on a hot, crowded train headed to Pondicherry, India. Clark and Satjeet Pandher had taken leaves of absences from their jobs in Vancouver to spend several months travelling in south Asia and Europe in 2013. Clark, a public relations professional, had tired of her corporate life but wasn't sure exactly what to do next.



SPOT NEWS

Comments: First and second place could be cropped tighter.  Third place, while taken at an unscheduled event, might have placed better in general news since it also could fit in there.[/i]


1. Shane MacKichan/ for Postmedia

A flat deck truck was left teetering over the side of Hwy 17 in Delta on March 23rd. Firefighters responded and secured the vehicle to a large semi truck before climbing over the side and rescuing the driver was who uninjured, but very shaken.

2. Liam Richards/Saskatoon StarPhoenix

Defence lawyer Brian Pfefferle speaks with the Saskatoon Fire Department's Hazardous Material Unit as they investigate another suspicious package this time at  Pfefferle's law office on the 300 block of 21st Street East in Saskatoon, SK on Thursday, March 30, 2017. Pfefferle is representing a woman accused of sending suspicious packages in 2016.

3. Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press

A young man smokes a joint as police officers stand outside the Cannabis Culture shop during a police raid, in Vancouver, B.C., on Thursday March 9, 2017. Prominent marijuana activists Marc and Jodie Emery have been arrested in Toronto and police are raiding several pot dispensaries associated with the couple.



MULTI-PHOTO


Comments:Strong images, newsworthy topic great edit
1. Leah Hennel/Calgary Herald

Syrian refugee Lina Hejazi, 32, looks out at the sights of Banff on Thursday March 23, 2017, during a new program being offered by Brewster Travel Canada where they be take new refugees and immigrants to see the Rockies in a first class experience.


Elena Soare, 6, who came to Canada with her family from Romania, looks out the bus window during a new program being offered by Brewster travel Canada where they take newcomers to see the Rockies for the first time.


Syrian refugees Khaled Hussain,6, left, and Abdo Alotaiki, 13, react to seeing the mountains and Lake Minnewanka in Banff National Park on Thursday March 23, 2017, during a new program being offered by Brewster Travel Canada where they take new refugees and immigrants to see the Rockies in a first class experience.


No caption provided.


No caption provided.


Syrian refugee Lina Hejazi, 32, and her son Khaled Hussain, 6, left, and Beatrice Justice-D, 6, with her mom Isabella, from Nigeria, at Lake Minnewanka in Banff on Thursday March 23, 2017, during a new program being offered by Brewster Travel Canada where they take immigrants and refugees to see the Rockies in a first class experience.


Syrian refugee Lina Hejazi, 32, and her son Khaled Hussain, 6, left, and Beatrice Justice-D, 6, with her mom Isabella, from Nigeria, at Lake Minnewanka in Banff on Thursday March 23, 2017, during a new program being offered by Brewster Travel Canada.


Syrian refugee Lina Hejazi, 32, and her son Khaled Hussain, 6, take the gondola to the to[ of the mountain in Banff National Park on Thursday March 23, 2017, during a new program being offered by Brewster Travel Canada.


Syrian refugee Lina Hejazi, 32, and her son Khaled Hussain, 6, look out at the rocky mountains in Banff on Thursday March 23, 2017, during a new program being offered by Brewster Travel Canada.


*No caption provided.


Syrian refugee Lina Hejazi, 32, and her kids Khaled Hussain, 6, left, and Lara Hussain, 10, enjoy the views of Sulphur Mountain in Banff National Park on Thursday March 23, 2017, during a new program being offered by Brewster Travel Canada.


Comments:Nice variety, great expressions, fun
2. Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press

Hopefuls stretch before auditions for the Canadian Football League's B.C. Lions' Felions dance team, in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday March 19, 2017. Approximately 150 women auditioned to fill up to 40 positions on the dance team. Those who are chosen perform at games and make public appearances on behalf of the team throughout the season.


Hopefuls are put through a workout to warm-up during auditions for the Canadian Football League's B.C. Lions' Felions dance team, in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday March 19, 2017. Approximately 150 women auditioned to fill up to 40 positions on the dance team. Those who are chosen perform at games and make public appearances on behalf of the team throughout the season.


Hopefuls practice the steps to a dance routine before performing in groups for judges during auditions for the Canadian Football League's B.C. Lions' Felions dance team, in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday March 19, 2017. Approximately 150 women auditioned to fill up to 40 positions on the dance team. Those who are chosen perform at games and make public appearances on behalf of the team throughout the season.


Breanna Watkins, right, does a split jump as she and others wait to audition for the Canadian Football League's B.C. Lions' Felions dance team, in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday March 19, 2017. Approximately 150 women auditioned to fill up to 40 positions on the dance team. Those who are chosen perform at games and make public appearances on behalf of the team throughout the season.


Others wait their turn as a woman performs a dance routine for judges during auditions for the Canadian Football League's B.C. Lions' Felions dance team, in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday March 19, 2017. Approximately 150 women auditioned to fill up to 40 positions on the dance team. Those who are chosen perform at games and make public appearances on behalf of the team throughout the season.


A hopeful performs a tumbling routine during auditions for the Canadian Football League's B.C. Lions' Felions dance team, in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday March 19, 2017. Approximately 150 women auditioned to fill up to 40 positions on the dance team. Those who are chosen perform at games and make public appearances on behalf of the team throughout the season.


Sade Deroche reacts while performing a dance routine in front of judges during auditions for the Canadian Football League's B.C. Lions' Felions dance team, in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday March 19, 2017. Approximately 150 women auditioned to fill up to 40 positions on the dance team. Those who are chosen perform at games and make public appearances on behalf of the team throughout the season.


Hopefuls practice the steps to a dance routine before performing in groups for judges during auditions for the Canadian Football League's B.C. Lions' Felions dance team, in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday March 19, 2017. Approximately 150 women auditioned to fill up to 40 positions on the dance team. Those who are chosen perform at games and make public appearances on behalf of the team throughout the season.


Hopefuls perform during auditions for the Canadian Football League's B.C. Lions' Felions dance team, in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday March 19, 2017. Approximately 150 women auditioned to fill up to 40 positions on the dance team. Those who are chosen perform at games and make public appearances on behalf of the team throughout the season.


A hopeful performs a dance routine for judges during auditions for the Canadian Football League's B.C. Lions' Felions dance team, in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday March 19, 2017. Approximately 150 women auditioned to fill up to 40 positions on the dance team. Those who are chosen perform at games and make public appearances on behalf of the team throughout the season.


A hopeful reacts as cuts are made during auditions for the Canadian Football League's B.C. Lions' Felions dance team, in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday March 19, 2017. Approximately 150 women auditioned to fill up to 40 positions on the dance team. Those who are chosen perform at games and make public appearances on behalf of the team throughout the season.

Comments:good coverage of sports event
3. Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press

Australia's Edward Jenkins, right, scores a try as France's Jeremy Aicardi, top left, and Terry Bouhraoua collide during Rugby Sevens World Series action, in Vancouver, B.C., on Saturday March 11, 2017.


Fiji's Kalione Nasoko, right, grabs the ball out of the air away from Wales' James Benjamin, left, and runs for a try during World Rugby Sevens Series action, in Vancouver, B.C., on Saturday March 11, 2017.


United States' Folau Niua looks on during quarterfinal World Rugby Sevens Series action against South Africa, in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday March 12, 2017.


New Zealand's DJ Forbes, left, grabs England's Daniel Bibby by the foot but fails to stop him from scoring a try during World Rugby Sevens Series action, in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday March 12, 2017.


South Africa's Rosko Specman, top, leaps over Canada's Lucas Hammond during World Rugby Sevens Series action, in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday March 12, 2017.


England's Richard de Carpentier, centre, dives to score a try as South Africa's Chris Dry, left, defends and Rosko Specman, third left, and Philip Snyman, right, watch during the World Rugby Sevens Series final, in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday March 12, 2017.


United States' Stephen Tomasin scores a try against Japan during World Rugby Sevens Series action, in Vancouver, B.C., on Saturday March 11, 2017.


Spectators dressed in costumes watch the U.S. and South Africa play during quarterfinal World Rugby Sevens Series action, in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday March 12, 2017.


Canada's Harry Jones runs for a try during World Rugby Sevens Series action against New Zealand, in Vancouver, B.C., on Saturday March 11, 2017.


United States' Maka Unufe, back, and Australia's Liam McNamara leap for the ball during World Rugby Sevens Series action, in Vancouver, B.C., on Saturday March 11, 2017.


Pyrotechnics go off as United States and Fiji players take to the field to play the third-place final during World Rugby Sevens Series action, in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday March 12, 2017.


United States' Folau Niua, front, is upended by Australia's Nicholas Malouf, left, as James Stannard watches during World Rugby Sevens Series action, in Vancouver, B.C., on Saturday March 11, 2017.


Canada's Nathan Hirayama, right, is hit by Argentina's Felipe Del Mestre during quarterfinal World Rugby Sevens Series action, in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday March 12, 2017.


Canada's Nathan Hirayama lies on the field after failing to stop South Africa from scoring a try during World Rugby Sevens Series action, in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday March 12, 2017.


United States' Folau Niua, far left, Stephen Tomasin, second left, Andrew Durutalo, back, and Ben Pinkleman, far right, react as South Africa's Philip Snyman, from left to right, Werner Kok, Siviwe Soyizwapi and Rosko Specman, bottom right, celebrate after South Africa stopped the United States from scoring a go-ahead try on the final play and won the match, during quarterfinal World Rugby Sevens Series action, in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday March 12, 2017.


England's Tom Mitchell, centre, hoists the trophy as he and his teammates celebrate after defeating South Africa to win the World Rugby Sevens Series, in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday March 12, 2017.


Comments: Thank you for the opportunity to judge this.  Great work being done in your region.


2017 CURRENT STANDINGS:                      MONTH…TOTAL


1. Darryl Dyck/Freelance…170…530
2. Leah Hennel/Calgary Herald…150…430
3. Ben Nelms/Freelance…0…300
4. Kevin Light/Freelance…60…220
5. Michelle Berg/The Star Phoenix...40...170
6. David Bloom/Edmonton Sun…70…140
7. Jeff Mcintosh/The Canadian Press…40…110
8. Jay Wallace/ISN…50…100
9. Chad Hipolito/Freelance…40…80
10. Ian Martens/Lethbridge Herald…0…50
11. Crystal Schick/Moose Jaw Times-Herald…0…50







3
Quote from: Jimmy Jeong
What I'm suggesting is that we need to discover new partners in this gig-economy. The Freelancers Union in New York is the perfect example. They are one of the major drivers to help push through the Freelance Isn't Free Act. Which ensures timely payment and proper contracts for all freelancers.

In the US and UK, various organizations were able to get their respective governments to pass laws with respect to timely payments. In the New York area and in the UK, you don't have to chase late-paying customers on your own anymore.

In the past, US photo organizations helped negotiate standard editorial contracts with Forbes and Conde Nast as well as commercial contracts with large companies like Kraft Foods. In Canada, CAPIC helped to successfully lobby for changes in our copyright laws. Perhaps CMG might be able to grow into a position like that for the editorial side.

In Canada, large TV networks, especially the CBC, seem to love standard contracts. There is a similar situation with some US TV networks. These "standard" contracts just provide the basic starting points: photographer will supply X photos in exchange for $Y; If situation A occurs then the photographer gets paid $B; If C occurs then the photographer gets paid $D.

Yes, a savvy photographer can often do this on their own but there aren't a lot of savvy photographers. CMG might be able to save some photographers from themselves :)  or prevent  them from being preyed upon by certain media organizations.

But how many professional organizations can we support? Photo-wise, there's NPAC, CAPIC and PPOC. For writers, there's at least CMG, WGC and CAA. Most freelancers, photo or word, face similar issues.
4
The F-35.There have been so many words written and spoken with so much political  heat and so little light I would like bring some practical information and context relating to it's military role. The information is skimmed from many aircraft  publications on news stands.

The issue of procurement should be expanded to include drone aircraft as well as used Super F/A-18. The US only, stealth F-22 would be an ideal aircraft for Canada at a price of $450 million.

From reading political stories this new aircraft may appear in the public's eye looking like a very hot potato with wings and flaming  Loonies coming out it's tail .Instead, let us look at this as a choice  Canadian pilots will depend on in future conflicts. Conflicts our politicians will  get our pilots  involved with.


A primer for Canadian journalists. The F-35 is already in the air with Dutch, Norwegian, Italian and US pilots. The Australian Air Force  has ordered 72 F35A's  to replace it's F-18 Hornets. According to Air International 2015  (has a large F-35 supplement with stories from every country making a purchase except Canada) says that the Aussies are considering getting rid of their Super F/A-18's bought in 2011 to increase their total F-35 numbers to 100 aircraft.

Maybe Canada should look into buying nearly new Super Hornets from countries upgrading to the newest technology. The F-35 Lightning 2 are now coming off the production line. Buying used is not unusual, Norway purchased used CF-104's from Canada years ago.

These Super F/A-18  replaced older Australian F-111's and the US Navy F-14 Tomcats , so it is a formidable aircraft.


The current aircraft technology is designed to defeat surface to air defenses. With the high cost of the fifth generation aircraft maybe a mobile anti aircraft /anti missile defense is in order. Obviously these systems are pretty good if offensive aircraft require stealth to defeat them. It is just a cost of one over the other to be considered. Just a thought.


So what then of the F-35 and when did Canada last fly first line fighters?

Not in WW2. Canadian fight pilots flew “hand me down” Hurricane fighters when the British kept top of the line Spitfires for themselves until more Spits became available. Canadians also flew outdated“low and slow” Halifax bombers that caused the death or capture of many Canadian air crews.

In the 1950's Canadian fighters flew top fighters in the  F-86 Sabre fighters considered the best dogfight aircraft of their era with a 11-1 kill ratio. The Sabre flew from 1950 to 1977.

Also during the 1950's ,with WW2 a close memory Canada produced it's own aircraft , specifically designed to fly in the arctic. The Avro CF-100 , all weather , high altitude , short takeoff all Canada engine and air frame. Over 692 were built. A Canadian aircraft built for Canada when a domestic aerospace business was considered a strategic asset. These were hard lessons learned from WW2. Lest We Forget.

Canadians also designed their own air superiority aircraft from scratch the Avro Arrow in 1958 , and discontinued in 1959 , only 5 were built. The high tech , advanced plane was scrapped for political and practical reasons. The missile age negated the flying high and fast doctrine of the day ,led to the rethinking  of defense against Russia with aircraft dropping nuclear bombs from planes.  Cancellation of  the Arrow and down grading of delta winged US aircraft like the B-58 Hustler. Sweden built it's own delta wing fighter and maintained it's own aerospace industry as a result. France , England and Italy  maintained a military aircraft industry building fighter jets, fixed wing bombers and helicopters in many cases as a consortium. Canada lost it's engineers to  NASA and other countries during the same time.

In the 1960's Canada flew first line  CF-101 Voodoos to defend the north 692 were built in Canada and never fired a shot during the Cold War. They carried nuclear bombs to be detonated over Canadian territory to kill waves of attacking Russian bombers. Not a great plan for Canada. These were expensive top line planes .The Voodoo flew from 1963 -1990.

Canada's and the Free World's top fighter was the F-104 Starfighter , Canada built 200 single engine aircraft and lost 110 to crashes. The plane was nicknamed the“widow maker”  because it's jet engines had a knack for shutting down unexpectantly , it became RCAF policy to buy planes with two engines. The CF-104 flew from 1961-1988. Never fired a shot in anger, but killed many Canadian pilots by crashing.

A pacifist's fighter.
When faced with purchasing a new fighter, Canada in 1968 choose the technologically “regressive” CF-5 over the US top of the line F-4 Phantom. The CF-5 never fired a shot in anger but was cheap and looked good. It was kind of a sports car of the air and many countries bought it. It also had an end of life extension “super”updated version for countries that already bought it with the F-5 Tiger 2.

Canada opted for second best when it chose to procure the two engine CF-18 over the single engine  F-16 and  the top of the line F-15 Eagle in 1982 .

Today the F-35 the long delays in development, cost over runs, and the devalued Loonie work against this purchase even though procurement thinking originated when the Canadian dollar was near par.


As a footnote Canada also  bought carrier planes , the McDonnell F-2H3 1955-62 to fly off the Canadian Navy's HMCS Bonaventure aircraft carrier. The CF-18 was also a carrier plane and retained it's carrier hook for emergency landings on short fields in the Arctic.   


Drones have now entered the equation because they are low cost to procure and operate. The drone debate is going on around the world. Politicians and journalists hate the high priced jets, the Air Force generals (former pilots) hate drones.

There are some surprising facts. The F-35 is an expensive and  stealthy , 5th generation war plane that can identify the enemy on it's own, it's sensors can see the battle space (air space above the battle ground) like the way new cars can see in 360 degrees circles, but in vertical and horizontal views with itself  in the centre. The plane can see long distances and can id the enemy and launch an attack shooting down the enemy sooner than conventional fighters . In simple terms it can shoot further, a sniper like weapon with the pilot in control.

The F-35 also saves the expense of owning other support aircraft that are also aging out in recon & jamming roles, and can shoot down fighters , bombers as well as attack the ground supporting troops. Some say it is too expensive to have near the ground supporting combat soldiers. Line of sight and an assault rifle negates stealth. During the Vietnam war factory workers in the north laid on their roof tops and shot straight up with rifles in the hope of striking an attacking fighter-bomber. They say they got some in the hail bullets. Even a blind squirrel can find a nut , comes to mind.

Norway's  WW2 experience may have influenced the  purchase of the F-35,it is a country  with a norther border similar to Canada. Norway's procurement mirrors Canada's since WW2. It differed slightly in the selection of the F-16  purchase over that  of Canada's F-18 (CF-18). Note that Norway and Holland both have an ethos of being invaded and occupied  by the Nazis in WW2 have decided to buy the F-35 along with Italy, Australia and the US.

The ethos of WW2 is still strong. The WW2 experience with Norway who's pilots fled to England with their outdated planes , eventually ended up in the Toronto area training on Canadian  built RAF Hurricanes to reenter the fight against the Germans. These pilots were young enough to influence Norway's air power choices right up the the end of the century.

Total war fighting is a different matter. What kind of wars does Canada expect to be fighting in the next 30 years? Why are our allies rearming with 5th generation fighters. Who do they expect to fight.  A war with countries that do not have an air force does not require F-35's. Countries that could put a billion boots on the ground and is also developing a 5th generation fighter of it's own , that looks a lot like a F-35, might muddle the choice. Muddled , not for pilots but for politicians and media.

Patrolling the Canada's North may fall to a drone air force backed up by advance fighters. It should be considered. Drones can also do drug interdiction on the left and right coasts as well as  surveillance,border and maritime patrols. They can stay in the air for very long periods of time at a low cost with their pilots safe on the ground in easy chairs.

A war with countries that are supported by Russia or China the F-35 or Super Hornet would be in order. The small numbers of cheaper Canadian Super F/A-18 a 4.5 generation fighter or more expensive 5th generation F-35 would simply be a puzzle piece in any coalition arsenal.
*The F-16 and F-18's were designed on Col. John Boyd's energy-maneuverability theory (1960-70's)that light and less expensive planes would perform well in combat. It is the  idea that a big engine in a smaller plane has turning and performance advantages. This proved to be the right choice in the air a wars that fallowed .The numbers of planes could be produced in massive numbers in the case of total war compared to the F-14 and F-15's,and today F-35's. 

 The newest electronics are in suitcase like packages that be plugged into 4 th generation F-18 aircraft turning them into 4.5th generation “Super” versions. Other modifications are also part of the Super version.

Something no one seems to be asking about is just who or what is the enemy of  Canada or the F-35. Traditionally, fighters  attack bombers and escort fighters  protecting them as in a WW2 scenario. The ego battles involve fighter vs fighters as in the movie Top Gun have not happened in decades. These dog fight senerios haven't happened in reality since the Vietnam War for the US , but more recently 1973 with Israeli war planes.

The F-35 is not one plane but 3 that serve a multi role function (F-35A at $102.1million each) that in theory replace ,fighters, fighter-bombers,close air support ,vertical and short take off from airfields(F-35B at $131million each)  or Navy planes small ski jump carriers and large aircraft carriers to withstand hard take offs and landings (F-35C at $132.2 million each) .

Surprisingly the F-22 Raptor would be a good choice for Canada and it's northern border. The planes are costed at $412 million each and can see targets 320 miles away. The F-22 always fly in pairs because they have sensors that can see the entire battle space without the need of AWAC support. The Raptor is already built and deployed , but it is a US only aircraft for security reasons.

Questions from F-22 pilots. Every story about stealth technology reveals that the aircraft are not invisible to anti aircraft radars. The planes are designed with a “low visibility” shapes and coatings. The coatings do wear off and radar signatures will become known as the planes appear more and more combat zones. The F-22 was kept out of combat for many years to presumably preserve the secrecy of  it's radar signature.

Basically countries from the  beginning of a new program like the F-35 are buying technology that hasn't been invented yet. They are buying involvement and economic benefits. The last versions should be less than $100 million.

The new fifth generation F-35's planes are built in 4 plane lots . Each lot is an improvement of glitches from former lot. Technology is built in suitcase like packages that are made to be easily plugged into older and upgraded.
There was much controversy over the price of the airplane, the information was always their but somehow during the last government's answers were not heard. The F-35's have been sold to various countries who also had elections and political controversy surround the planes muddled the waters over price because the delivered aircraft  came with an extra engine each an tech support.

One of the selling points is that the engine can be quickly replaced. Jet engines routinely flame out  or stop functioning. Combat readiness is simplified with quick change engines.

Controversy surrounds all brand new aircraft because it takes decades to develop, several elections pass before the “not yet”developed  technology of the future becomes combat ready. The time lag was  used to produce much theoretical election “left”, “right”fodder in every country that signed up for the Joint Strike Fighter. (and every jet fighter ever developed in peace time)

The question of which plane to buy is both political and military as well as practical. Political and practical usually go out the window in case of total war.
Opinion Ken Gigliotti


  ------------------------------------------------------------
5
Hi Blair, thanks for posting that. I totally agree that everyone needs to make their own choices that work for them. But just wanted to clarify that I'm not talking about the Norma Rae-Gets-On-A-Table movement old school union. I'm actually not really interested in a union per-se. What I'm suggesting is that we need to discover new partners in this gig-economy. The Freelancers Union in New York is the perfect example. They are one of the major drivers to help push through the Freelance Isn't Free Act. Which ensures timely payment and proper contracts for all freelancers.

So, I know I need more help. I wish NPAC was more organized and could be that advocate, had more resources, etc.
6
I'm not going to get into a debate here, but I don't see union involvement as being beneficial to me as a freelancer. Just wanted to post this so others don't assume that everyone is in favour of this idea. Shoot good photos, run your business well, make good choices about who you work for, and everything will be just fine. I do not see a future where rates go up and more assignments become available because a union is involved. They aren't the solution just because the sponsor NPAC.

I'm not saying don't join, though. If it looks good to you, go for it.
7
Great comments, David. We definitely need more education about our industry and our new major role in it. I hope that NPAC members will feel comfortable having more open discussions and sharing strategies for success. I'll definitely be looking into CMG.

Cheers
8
Tech Talk / More free photo software
« Last post by Warren Toda on May 23, 2017, 01:26 PM »
Topaz Labs, maker of various Photoshop/Lightroom plugins, today announced version 1.0 of its free Topaz Studio. This new software acts as a standalone application as well as a plugin for Photoshop/Lightroom. This free application does a few tricks and, of course, they'd like you to buy their other plugins.

If you like to try new software, give it a go.

I haven't used Topaz Studio but I've used some of the other Topaz plugins. Some are okay and some are rather cheesy. None of the plugins are "must-have" but they can come in handy once in a while even though the interface isn't that good (eg. fonts and sliders much too small, sliders can be overly sensitive, won't output to a new layer, not particularly Mac-like).
9
General Discussion / Re: NPAC's stance on the Arrest of David Ritchie
« Last post by Ken Gigliotti on May 21, 2017, 02:59 PM »
The arrest of photographers lawfully doing their work has occurred before. Freedom of the press , literally means the press, but when photographers are involved charges are usually dropped when every one cools down. Photographers are usually treated differently. There is a reluctance to create a legal precedent that extends “press” to photographers. It is rare that a charge against a news photographer ever goes to court. I do not know if the right words or actions occurred to trigger an obstruction charge , usually these emotional incidents are reexamined in time and are found unwarranted for court action. Photographers as members of the press ,what a great idea to test in court. Will it ever happen?
10
Good job NPAC/CMG

I have just joined and see nothing but long term benefits from being involved.

At the recent NPAC Convention there was a show of hands poll on how many in attendance were staff vs. freelancers, and it was about 90% freelancers!  Actually the representation by staff photographers (especially GTA area) was pathetic, but that's another topic that needs to be addressed. 

So the Freelance Army certainly would benefit from more organization, education and representation, especially since we are the majority.  Do you see that trend changing?  Time for everyone in the industry to start working on fair, respectful deployment of the Freelancer.

Thanks again NPAC/GMG!
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